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I find the videos on youtube have http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RArlg6HeZZM urls.

the RArlg6HeZZM is unique to a video and if you change one letter it doesn't work so it's nice for privacy.

I've tried decrypters like 64 and 32 decrypters to find out what the original values but can't, so they're doing something fancy. Any ideas of how they are doing it? I would like to implement this functionality on my site for my site's videos. Thank you!

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Reverse engineering bits of YouTube are rather off topic. I suggest you rephrase your question to focus on what you want to achieve and give YouTube as an example of someone who has does it. Or does it matter that you use exactly the same technique as YouTube to get that result? –  Quentin Apr 15 '12 at 6:46
    
possible duplicate of How to design a sequential hash-like function –  Quentin Apr 15 '12 at 6:48
    
I want to achieve URL's that aren't decryptable by people using simple decrypters so I could have url's with videos that people can see only if they know the url because they won't be showing up on the search results. if I do a 64 encode, people can encode any id number and try it out. So If i encode video id 123 and 124 is private, all they will do is encode 124 and see the private video. In youtube I'm unable to decode it, so I don't know the url to their 124th video. –  Darius Apr 15 '12 at 6:53

2 Answers 2

They're using a technique called hashing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cryptographic_hash_function

Hashing creates unique strings (for the most part) without revealing what the original string was. The reason you can't decode the ID is because you're not supposed to - that's the beauty of a hash.

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The hashing part I understand but I'm afraid of saying hd(id) like hd123 will be a duplicate of sd(id) like sd420. I'm afraid of having hd123 and sd420 having a value of lets say H5nrW because the math will somehow add up. or if I add up two hashes like base of 123 + base of 320 it would give G30j0f for example, what makes me certain there isn't a value like base 4120481028 that will give me the same result? Hope I'm delivering my message/question clearly. –  Darius Apr 15 '12 at 7:02
    
Hashing algorithms (like MD5 or SHA) are designed so that every string results in a unique hash, which cannot be reversed back to the source string. So for example, using an md5 hash, you get the following: "1" = c4ca4238a0b923820dcc509a6f75849b "2" = c81e728d9d4c2f636f067f89cc14862c Each string will be unique - and see how there is seemingly no correlation between the source and the output? To answer the original question, YouTube is doing something like that. –  soulkphp May 13 '12 at 4:49

This is a randomly generated "hash". This isn't actually something which is an MD5 hash or anything. Its their own hashing algorithm. There is no reason for them to make youtube private; for that they have other methods. What your seeing up top, is a "hash" which gets plugged into their data retrieval algorithm. This way makes it look nicer and is more "random". When you have the index increment, it looks sloppy; you type in 300 and you will find out the 300th video which was uploaded to the site.

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The hashing part I understand but I'm afraid of saying hd(id) like hd123 will be a duplicate of sd(id) like sd420. I'm afraid of having hd123 and sd420 having a value of lets say H5nrW because the math will somehow add up. or if I add up two hashes like base of 123 + base of 320 it would give G30j0f for example, what makes me certain there isn't a value like base 4120481028 that will give me the same result? Hope I'm delivering my message/question clearly. –  Darius Apr 15 '12 at 6:59

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