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I want to use a function to allocate and initialize two related struct instances. However I can't get the memory to persist outside of the allocation function. Also, I'd rather do this without memory leaks if at all possible:

void alloc_init(foo_struct *bar, foo_struct *baz){
    //Create some values in here
    bar = new foo_struct(created_val1, created_val2);
    baz = new foo_struct(created_val3, created_val4);
}

If I check the value of created_val1 in bar from within alloc_init() it's totally fine... But once alloc_init pops off the stack, I'm getting garbage. How do I make these kinds of values persist?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to pass the pointers by reference:

void alloc_init(foo_struct *& bar, foo_struct *& baz){
    //Create some values in here
    bar = new foo_struct(created_val1, created_val2);
    baz = new foo_struct(created_val3, created_val4);
}

Because you pass your pointers by value, you're allocating memory for copies of the original pointers inside the functions.

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1  
@Als a more useful comment would have been a counter-example. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:33
1  
@Als I don't follow. Why is this wrong? –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:36
1  
@Als ah, ok I see the confusion. It wasn't a rule. What I meant was - In C++, everything is passed by value unless stated otherwise. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:40
1  
@Als the "unless stated otherwise" meant that you pass everything by values unless you explicitly pass it by reference. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:42
1  
If you have to explain a comment with two comments of double the size of the original comment i would believe the comment was badly worded enough to convey something(wrong) which perhaps it didn't mean to. –  Alok Save Apr 15 '12 at 7:44

You can make them static, which isn't the greatest solution. Or you can declare global variables at a higher scope, such as in a more-persistent class or global variable.

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1  
-1 terrible suggestion. What class? Why static? Why use globals when you don't need to? –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:27
    
@LuchianGrigore: But it answers the question. Which medicine is most appropriate to use is up to the engineer. –  wallyk Apr 15 '12 at 7:28
    
Unfortunately I can't really declare the variables at a higher scope, as the function itself is used to generate those values. I am however interested in why static variables would be useful here, if you could please elaborate. –  machine yearning Apr 15 '12 at 7:31
    
No it doesn't. The memory persists outside the function scope anyway, since it's allocated in dynamic memory. However, the original pointers still won't point to it. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '12 at 7:31

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