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My task is read two strings of digits and save them in different arrays. I decided to use scanf function, but program can read only first string. This is my bad-code.

int main()
{

    int firstArray[50], secondArray[50], i, j;

    /* fill an array with 0 */
    for(i=0; i<50; ++i)
    {
        firstArray[i]=secondArray[i]=0;
    }

    i=j=0;

    while((scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]))== 1) { ++i; }
    while((scanf("%d", &secondArray[j]))== 1) { ++j; }

    /* Print this. */
    for(i = 0; i < 20; ++i)
    {
        printf("%d ", firstArray[i]);
    }
    putchar('\n');

    for(j = 0; j < 20; ++j)
    {
        printf("%d ", secondArray[j]);
    }

    return 0;
}

I just don't understand how scanf function works. Can someone please explain?

share|improve this question
    
What does the input to scanf look like? –  Mr Lister Apr 15 '12 at 9:16
    
#first line 123 54 34 54 3455 [end of line ; or \n ]. And the #second line is the same/ –  Ascelhem Apr 15 '12 at 9:24
    
@user1334306 read this comment only now, going to update my answer! –  ShinTakezou Apr 15 '12 at 10:11

4 Answers 4

scanf ignores blank characters (including new line). Thus your scan will read entire input into firstArray if you have no "non blank" separator.

If file/data has ; at end of first line it will stop the read into firstArray there, and never read anything into secondArray - as you never consume the ;.

/* This will never be 1 as ; is blocking */
while((scanf("%d", &secondArray[i])) == 1) { 

So: if you separate with i.e. ; you will have to read / check for this before you read into secondArray.

You could also add something like:

char c;

/* this can be done more tidy, but only as concept */
while((scanf("%d", &firstArray[i])) == 1 && i < max) {
    ++i;
    if ((c = getchar()) == '\n' || c == ';')
        break;
}

Also instead of initializing array to 0 by loop you can say:

int firstArray[50] = {0}; /* This set every item to 0 */

Also take notice to ensure you do not go over your 50 limit.

share|improve this answer

You say strings of digits and you read %d. The format scans the input for the longest sequence representing an integer (signed) value. Two "digit strings" are consumed by the first while loop.

EDIT Instead of "strings of digits" you should say "strings of integers". In this case it is a little bit more subtle since the first while can consume all the integers, unless they are separated by something that is not a possible integer (e.g. a ;).

So, to make the following to work, you must separate the two "lines" with something that can't be parsed as integer and which is not considered "white character". Not the better solution, but one the possible.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main()
{

  int firstArray[50] = {0};
  int secondArray[50] = {0};
  int i, j, l1, l2;
  int tmp;

  i = j = 0;

  // read integers, but not more than size of array
  while( scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]) == 1 && i < sizeof(firstArray) ) { 
    ++i; 
  }

  // consume non digits
  for(tmp = getchar(); tmp != EOF && !isdigit(tmp); tmp = getchar());
  // on EOF you should exit and stop processing;
  // we read one more char, push it back if it was a digit
  if (isdigit(tmp)) ungetc(tmp, stdin);

  while( scanf("%d", &secondArray[j]) == 1 && j < sizeof(secondArray) ) { 
    ++j; 
  }

  l1 = i; // preserve how many ints were read
  l2 = j;

/* Print this. */
  for(i = 0; i < l1; ++i)
  {
    printf("%d ", firstArray[i]);
  }
  putchar('\n');

  for(j=0; j < l2; ++j)
  {
    printf("%d ", secondArray[j]);
  }

  return 0;
}

EDIT A solution that maybe fits your need better is to read the lines (one per time) into a buffer and sscanf the buffer.

share|improve this answer

You cannot use scanf to do that.

Read the documentation.

Observations:

  1. with scanf if you enter a digit your loop runs forever
  2. there is no check on size 50 limit of your arrays
  3. if you press return then it ignores that line because does not match your pattern
  4. if you enter a letter the pattern does not match and loop breaks

So use some other function, maybe gets, atoi or strtol. And remember to check the size 50 limit of your arrays.

share|improve this answer
    
scanf will not run forever if number is entered, he will read that number and if next read is not a number or blank break the while loop. A letter will not result in an exception. It will simply not be read and both while loops will terminate. –  Morpfh Apr 15 '12 at 10:14
    
If it is not number you have an error, if you enter blank it skips that line and continues the loop. Try it. –  dash1e Apr 15 '12 at 10:23
    
If it is not a number or not a blank it breaks the while loop. If it is not a number it will not be an error. He checks if scanf result in 1 read item. Therefore if there is a non blank or non number the scanf will return 0 and the while loop break. Not an exception or error. –  Morpfh Apr 15 '12 at 10:35
    
@Rune sorry with error I means the scanf failure, and with run forever I mean that if he enters a number his loop condition is always true, also after 50 elements. –  dash1e Apr 15 '12 at 10:55

Actually, there is one special point in C's arrays.

Though you declare an array's size. say int arr[5]; You can store values beyond the size of 5. It doesn't show any error but leads to undefined behavior (Might overwrite other variables).

Please Refer this question: array size less than the no. of elements stored in it

In you case, that was your problem. The compiler had never passed beyond the first while statements. Thus, you didn't get any output. In fact, it didn't even compile the whole code yet!

while((scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]))== 1) { ++i; }

So, you could write this while statement like this:

while(  scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]) ==1 && i<50 )  
    i++;

or else:

while(i<50 )
{
        scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]);             
        i++;
}

or else:

for (i=0; i<50; i++)
    scanf("%d", &firstArray[i]);
share|improve this answer
    
Your examples is wrong. You compare pointer of array with 1. Further you increment i even if there is no number read. And your second and third example never breaks if read items != 1. –  Morpfh Apr 15 '12 at 10:40
    
@Rune Take a look at them now! Actually, I just copied from what he wrote and forgot to delete those.. –  Surya Apr 15 '12 at 12:39
    
Better, but on the two last examples you do not validate read, and as pattern does not change if there is something else then a blank (space, tab, newline) you keep on trying to read but never get further. I.e if you have input 1 4 8; 3 6 5 you'll read 1,4 and 8 into firstArray[0], [1] and [2] - then try to read next number until i is 50 - but as next character is ; you'll never advance. –  Morpfh Apr 15 '12 at 12:56

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