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my problem is the following. I have made a code design for a home project which is apparently not working. Maybe you can help me to figure out where the "code smell" comes from.

Ok let's start: I have defined some classes to wrap around different kind of archive types:

public abstract class Archive { }
public class ZipArchive : Archive { }
public class TarArchive : Archive { }

To handle with those archives, I defined Manager classes. An abstract one that defines the needed behaviour,

public abstract class ArchiveManager<T> where T : Archive
{ 
    public abstract void OpenArchive(T archive);
}

And the concrete ones, that actually implement the specific behaiour:

public class ZipArchiveManager : ArchiveManager<ZipArchive>
{
    public override void OpenArchive(ZipArchive archive) {  /* .. */ }
}

public class TarArchiveManager : ArchiveManager<TarArchive>
{
    public override void OpenArchive(TarArchive archive) {  /* .. */ }
}

What happens now is that during compile time, I dont know which kind of archives I will process, so I tried the following:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        ArchiveManager<Archive> archiveManager = null;

        if (/*some condition*/) {            
            archiveManager = new ZipArchiveManager();
        }
        else {
            archiveManager = new TarArchiveManager();
        }
    }
}

which ended up in the following error:

Cannot implicitly convert type 'ZipArchiveManager' to 'ArchiveManager'

As far as I understand, the generic argument cannot be implicitely converted. Is there any way to come around this? Does this code / design "smell"?

Thank you very much in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Create a non generic base class, or use a covariant interface. –  CodesInChaos Apr 15 '12 at 9:29
1  
Also, the signature of OpenArchive looks wrong to me. Shouldn't it receive a stream, and return T? –  CodesInChaos Apr 15 '12 at 9:30

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use a contravariant interface instead of an abstract class that doesn't implement any functionality. In this case, you can only use the type parameter as a return value of a method, not as an argument:

public interface IArchiveManager<out T>
    where T : Archive
{
    T OpenArchive(Stream stream);
}

Then, simply implement the interface in your manager classes:

public class ZipArchiveManager : IArchiveManager<ZipArchive>
{
    public ZipArchive OpenArchive(Stream stream)
    {
        // ...
    }
}

public class TarArchiveManager : IArchiveManager<TarArchive>
{
    public TarArchive OpenArchive(Stream stream)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answers. Contravariant interface seem to be the only way to overcome this. However I believe I have to re-think my architecture as a whole... :( –  Flagg1980 Apr 17 '12 at 15:14

I found another way by using the "dynamic" keyword of c# .NET 4.0...

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        dynamic archiveManager = null;

        if (/*some condition*/) {            
            archiveManager = new ZipArchiveManager();
        }
        else {
            archiveManager = new TarArchiveManager();
        }
    }
}

Works like a charm for me ;)

share|improve this answer
    
The downside of using dynamic is that you lose static type checking. If you ever decide to change your method names, method signatures or constructors, the compiler will not catch this for dynamic types. –  Michael May 2 '12 at 10:03

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