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I have this code:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>


int func(int n0, int n);

int main ()
{
    int n0, n, nFinal=0;
    printf ("Enter constant (n0): ");
    scanf ("%d", &n0);
    printf ("Enter the number of iteractions (n): ");
    scanf ("%d", &n);
    nFinal = func(n0, n);
    printf ("nFinal after %d iteractions is %d: \n", n, nFinal);
    return 0;
}

int func(int n0, int n){
    int i,nFinal=0;

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++){
        nFinal = (nFinal*nFinal) + n0;
    }

    return nFinal;
}

The nFinal is calculated within a for loop. I would like to achieve the same result but doing a recursive function.

From what I see, I cannot change the function call because I always need the start number and the number of iterations. Therefore, after the first iteration, the program would have to call again nFinal = func (n0, n); but as I need at each iteration of the calculated value of nFinal, I will have to change this.

Is it possible to make a recursive function but maintaining the function as nFinal = func (n0, n);?

Can someone point me some way?

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4  
In the body of your function func you have used nFinal before it has been initialised. Is this correct? –  Chris Apr 15 '12 at 10:12
    
@Chris Sorry. nFinal is initialized to zero –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 10:17

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Looking at your function

int func(int n0, int n){
    int i,nFinal=0;

    for (i = 0; i < n; i++){
        nFinal = (nFinal*nFinal) + n0;
    }

    return nFinal;
}

If n is (less than) 0, your result is 0. Then the new value of nFinal is the old value of nFinal^2 + n0, so you get:

int func(int n0, int n){
    if (n <= 0) return 0;

    int f = func(n0, n-1);
    return f*f + n0;
}
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Oops, thought I got an error and deleted, but it seems to be alright. –  Anthales Apr 15 '12 at 10:27
    
Thanks.It's working but I have 1 doubt.I understand that f = func(n0, n-1) will be recursive until n<=0. At this point f will have the value 0. The problem is that I'm not understanding the return f*f + n0.At this point it will not be 0*0+n0? Assume that I have n0 = 2 and n = 4.Since n it's not <=0 int will enter on int f like func(2,4-1); then func(2,3-1); then func(2,2-1); and finally func(2,1-1);. Since n <= 0 it will return 0. Should't it stop there? Or return f*f + n0; will not do 0*0+2 and returning that value to main but f*f will do the recursive call again? –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 11:40
    
I'll tell you what your problem is: You are trying to think about recursion recursively (top to bottom)! That is really not the way to understand recursion, try to figure it out bottom to top. f(n0, 0) will be 0. f(n0, 1) will be f(n0, 0)^2 + n0 = 0^2 + n0 and so on... –  Anthales Apr 15 '12 at 11:45
    
More generally there are some mantras if you want to understand recursion: I told you the first: 1. "don't think about it recursively", 2. "assume you already have the answer for n-1 - and think about how to derive the answer for n", 3. answer the problem for small values directly (to assure that the recursion will end) –  Anthales Apr 15 '12 at 11:48
    
Thanks. My understanding It's a bit blurry but will try to figure it out. –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 13:53

I think you are looking for this:

int func(int n0, int n){
    if (n > 1){
        int nFinal = func(n0, --n);
        return (nFinal*nFinal) + n0;
    }
    return n0; // (0*0) + n0
}

note that if (n == 1) it returns n0, else it calls func, stores its return value in nFinal and returns (nFinal*nFinal) + n0.

Equivalent version of this function could call itself also for n == 1 and return 0 for n == 0.

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Thanks for your solution. It's on the same page as the one provided by Anthales. My doubts are the same as in is solution. –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 13:55

In each iteration, you do some math on the original value (and the parameter), then store it. You have two broad choices about how to make it recursive.

  1. Do all the iterations for n-1 first, then do some more math on it before returning it. This seems a more natural first go at making it recursive.

  2. Do this iteration's math first, then pass the results in a recursive call to do the rest of the calculation. This is tail recursive (which is unlikely to be of importance unless n is going to get really big and you know your compiler is going to optimise it away to save stack space ;-).

Recursion is like mathematical induction. You need to think of your base case, and your induction step. In your function, your base case is something like:

  • If n = 0, then func(n0, n) returns 0.

And your step is:

  • func(n0, n) returns func(n0,n-1) * func(n0,n-1) + n0. (You can call the function just once and save it to a local variable.)

This translates to a standard if-else construct. See if you can understand it so far, if you get stuck let me know.

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Thanks for your explanation –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 10:46
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

int func_r(int n0, int n, int acc);

int main (){
    int n0, n, nFinal;
    printf ("Enter constant (n0): ");
    scanf ("%d", &n0);
    printf ("Enter the number of iteractions (n): ");
    scanf ("%d", &n);
    nFinal = func_r(n0, n, 0);
    printf ("nFinal after %d iteractions is %d: \n", n, nFinal);
    return 0;
}

int func_r(int n0, int n, int acc){
    if(n == 0)
        return acc;
    return func_r(n0, n-1, acc*acc + n0);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ideally I should maintain int func(int n0, int n) as it is. Nevertheless thanks for another solution –  Favolas Apr 15 '12 at 10:45

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