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As part of piloting a survey, I presented each Turker with sets of choices amongst four alternatives. The data looks like this:

> so
  WorkerId pio_1_1 pio_1_2 pio_1_3 pio_1_4 pio_2_1 pio_2_2 pio_2_3 pio_2_4
1        1     Yes      No      No      No      No      No     Yes      No
2        2      No     Yes      No      No     Yes      No     Yes      No
3        3     Yes     Yes      No      No     Yes      No     Yes      No

I'd like it to look like this:

WorkerId set pio1 pio2 pio3 pio4
       1   1  Yes   No   No   No
       1   2   No   No  Yes   No
...

I can kludge through this by a number of means, none of which seem very elegant:

  • Swapping the order of the numbers with regexes and backreferencing and then using reshape()
  • Writing my own little function to parse out the first digit between the underscores and then reshape it long
  • Splitting and then stacking the columns (relies on the ordering being right)

But it seems to me that all of these ignore the idea that data in what you might call "double wide" format has its own structure. I'd love to use the reshape2 package for this, but despite the data having been produced with cast() I don't see any options that would help me truly melt this data.frame back.

Suggestions welcome.

so <- structure(list(WorkerId = 1:3, pio_1_1 = structure(c(2L, 1L, 
2L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_1_2 = structure(c(1L, 
2L, 2L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_1_3 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_1_4 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = "No", class = "factor"), pio_2_1 = structure(c(1L, 
2L, 2L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_2_2 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_2_3 = structure(c(2L, 
2L, 2L), .Label = c("No", "Yes"), class = "factor"), pio_2_4 = structure(c(1L, 
1L, 1L), .Label = "No", class = "factor")), .Names = c("WorkerId", 
"pio_1_1", "pio_1_2", "pio_1_3", "pio_1_4", "pio_2_1", "pio_2_2", 
"pio_2_3", "pio_2_4"), row.names = c(NA, 3L), class = "data.frame")
share|improve this question
    
Everyone gave fun and insightful answers, but I makes gauden's as the green check since it used reshape2 as preferred in the question. –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 16 '12 at 1:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I am not sure if this is too obvious, but here goes. It should be self-explanatory. Pass in your so dataframe and it returns the reshaped data.

library("reshape2")

reshape.middle <- function(dat) {
    dat <- melt(so, id="WorkerId")
    dat$set <- substr(dat$variable, 5,5)
    dat$name <- paste(substr(dat$variable, 1, 4),
                      substr(dat$variable, 7, 7),
                      sep="")
    dat$variable <- NULL

    dat <- melt(dat, id=c("WorkerId", "set", "name"))
    dat$variable <- NULL

    return(dcast(dat, WorkerId + set ~ name))
}

so # initial form
so <- reshape.middle(so)
so # as needed

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
This approach is my favorite so far. Will likely change to regexes rather than specific patterns. But cool. Welcome to SO! –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 15 '12 at 14:28
    
@gsk3 -- Thanks for the vote and the welcome! And yes, of course, a regex would give some more flexibility in naming the workers. –  gauden Apr 15 '12 at 14:46

I would suggest doing some gsub on your names to get them into a form that R likes better, in other words, with the time variable being the last item, not the middle item, and with a "." being the default separator.

Try this:

names(so) = gsub("([a-z])_([0-9])_([0-9])", "\\1_\\3\\.\\2", names(so))
so.l = reshape(so, direction="long", varying=2:9, timevar="set", idvar=1)

Then, if you want to sort by WorkerId:

so.l = so.l[order(so.l$WorkerId), ]
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice. Adding idvar=1 would prevent the addition of the extranous "id" column. –  BondedDust Apr 15 '12 at 13:51
    
Very nice thinking. +1 –  Tyler Rinker Apr 15 '12 at 15:47
    
@DWin, I've edited my original response to include your suggestion. Thanks. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 15 '12 at 15:55

If we call your original data set dat this will do it using base:

dat2 <- reshape(dat, 
    varying=list(pio_1= c(2, 6), pio_2= c(3,7), pio_3= c(4,8), pio_4= c(5,9) ),
    v.names=c(paste0("pio_",1:4)), 
    idvar = "WorkerId",
    direction="long", 
    timevar="set") 
row.names(dat2) <- NULL
dat2[order(dat2$WorkerId, dat2$set), ]

Which yields:

  WorkerId set pio_1 pio_2 pio_3 pio_4
1        1   1   Yes    No    No    No
2        1   2    No    No   Yes    No
3        2   1    No   Yes    No    No
4        2   2   Yes    No   Yes    No
5        3   1   Yes   Yes    No    No
6        3   2   Yes    No   Yes    No

EDIT: (Alright I couldn't resist taking a crack at making it easier to automate)

y <- do.call('rbind', strsplit(names(dat)[-1], "_"))[, c(1, 3, 2)]
names(dat) <- c(names(dat)[1], paste0(y[, 1], "_", y[, 2], ".", y[, 3]))

dat2 <- reshape(dat, 
    varying=2:9, 
    idvar = "WorkerId",
    direction="long", 
    timevar="set")
row.names(dat2) <- NULL
dat2[order(dat2$WorkerId, dat2$set), ]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. That's a nice solution. Still leaves me coding up lists of variables though (actual data has 10+ vars in the same configuration as pio). But associating a name with a column number should be pretty easy using grep. –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 15 '12 at 12:59
    
I'm away from my computer right now but I think some form of grep with lapply/match would be a nice approach to generate the lists to feds to reshape. Possibly using strsplit as well. –  Tyler Rinker Apr 15 '12 at 13:43
    
I was going to work on this but when mrdwab's answer I said why bother. His is awesome. –  Tyler Rinker Apr 15 '12 at 16:30
    
Tyler Rinker, thanks for the comment; however, re-reading the description of the question by @gsk3, it occurs to me that they might have already figured out a solution similar to what I had suggested. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 15 '12 at 17:20
    
@mrdwab Our uses of reshape are nearly identical in the first portion the only difference is I have to explicitly tell varying what to stack because the names are not intuitive to R. I previously suggest the use of strsplit above and was just following up on that just because I'm avoiding writing a paper :) Your response is by far the most eloquent and least amount of code of the three and I'd be willing to bet the fastest. –  Tyler Rinker Apr 15 '12 at 17:57

Here's another solution using reshape2 and stringr

melt.wide = function(data, id.vars, new.names) {
  require(reshape2)
  require(stringr)
  data.melt = melt(data, id.vars=id.vars)
  new.vars = data.frame(do.call(
    rbind, str_extract_all(data.melt$variable, "[0-9]+")))
  names(new.vars) = new.names
  cbind(data.melt, new.vars)
}

Then, you use it like this:

> so.long = melt.wide(so, id.vars=1, new.names=c("set", "option"))
> dcast(so.long, WorkerId + set ~ option)
  WorkerId set   1   2   3  4
1        1   1 Yes  No  No No
2        1   2  No  No Yes No
3        2   1  No Yes  No No
4        2   2 Yes  No Yes No
5        3   1 Yes Yes  No No
6        3   2 Yes  No Yes No

I think that using stringr might prove to be a more simple solution than those in the functions that have been suggested so far.

A "triple wide" example

Here's why I like this solution: it also works if your data is, say, triple wide. Here's an example, (with data modified from here):

triplewide = structure(list(ID = 1:4, w1d1t1 = c(4L, 3L, 2L, 2L), w1d1t2 = c(5L, 
4L, 3L, 3L), w1d2t1 = c(6L, 5L, 5L, 4L), w1d2t2 = c(5L, 4L, 5L, 
2L), w2d1t1 = c(6L, 5L, 4L, 3L), w2d1t2 = c(5L, 4L, 5L, 5L), 
    w2d2t1 = c(6L, 3L, 6L, 3L), w2d2t2 = c(7L, 4L, 3L, 2L)), .Names = c("ID", 
"w1d1t1", "w1d1t2", "w1d2t1", "w1d2t2", "w2d1t1", "w2d1t2", "w2d2t1", 
"w2d2t2"), class = "data.frame", row.names = c(NA, -4L))

This is what it looks like to start with:

> triplewide
  ID w1d1t1 w1d1t2 w1d2t1 w1d2t2 w2d1t1 w2d1t2 w2d2t1 w2d2t2
1  1      4      5      6      5      6      5      6      7
2  2      3      4      5      4      5      4      3      4
3  3      2      3      5      5      4      5      6      3
4  4      2      3      4      2      3      5      3      2

A variable name like w1d1t1 means "week 1, day 1, test 1". Let's say that your expected "tidy data" should be a dataset with the columns "ID", "week", "day", "trial 1", and "trial 2", then you can use the function as follows:

> triplewide.long = melt.wide(triplewide, id.vars="ID",
+                             new.names=c("week", "day", "trial"))
> dcast(triplewide.long, ID + week + day ~ trial)
   ID week day 1 2
1   1    1   1 4 5
2   1    1   2 6 5
3   1    2   1 6 5
4   1    2   2 6 7
5   2    1   1 3 4
6   2    1   2 5 4
7   2    2   1 5 4
8   2    2   2 3 4
9   3    1   1 2 3
10  3    1   2 5 5
11  3    2   1 4 5
12  3    2   2 6 3
13  4    1   1 2 3
14  4    1   2 4 2
15  4    2   1 3 5
16  4    2   2 3 2
share|improve this answer
    
I like this. One concern is that it doesn't handle non-numeric values in its current form.... –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 16 '12 at 10:14
    
@gsk3, after a certain point, though I think some additional cleaning would be required depending on the form of the original data. For instance, if the variables were named as they are in this "triplewide" example, you would need to first do some cleaning up on the variable names before you can use your function. Similarly, if there were characters in my variable names, I would have to convert them to numbers or do some more fiddling with the function. Just goes to show that there's always more than one way to solve a problem! –  Ananda Mahto Apr 16 '12 at 11:27

Here's what I eventually went with, largely based off @gauden 's approach. In re-reading Hadley's tidy data pdf, it turns out he advises a similar course.

melt.wide <- function(data, id.vars, new.names, sep=".", variable.name="variable", ... ) {
  # Guess number of variables currently wide
  colnames(data) <- sub( paste0(sep,"$"), "",  colnames(data) )
  wide.vars <- colnames(data)[grep( sep, colnames(data) )]
  n.wide <- str_count( wide.vars, sep )
  stopifnot(length(new.names)==unique(n.wide))
  # Melt
  data.melt <- melt(data,id.vars=id.vars,measure.vars=wide.vars,...)
  new <- stack.list(str_split(data.melt$variable,sep))
  colnames(new) <- c(variable.name,new.names)
  data.melt <- subset(data.melt,select=c(-variable))
  cbind(data.melt,new)
}


# Stacks lists of data.frames (e.g. from replicate() )
stack.list <- function( x, label=FALSE, ... ) {
  ret <- x[[1]]
  if(label) { ret$from <- 1 }
  if(length(x)==1) return(ret)
  for( i in seq(2,length(x)) ) {
    new <- x[[i]]
    if(label) { new$from <- i }
    ret <- rbind(ret,new)
  }
  return(ret)
}

> dat<-melt.wide(so,id.vars="WorkerId",new.names=c("set","option"),sep="_")
> dcast(dat, WorkerId + set ~ option)
  WorkerId set   1   2   3  4
1        1   1 Yes  No  No No
2        1   2  No  No Yes No
3        2   1  No Yes  No No
4        2   2 Yes  No Yes No
5        3   1 Yes Yes  No No
6        3   2 Yes  No Yes No
share|improve this answer
    
I can't get your function to work. I run into a problem with stack.list. Is that a function in an R package that needs to be loaded before using your "melt.wide" function? –  Ananda Mahto Apr 16 '12 at 6:24
    
Oops. Added stack.list. –  Ari B. Friedman Apr 16 '12 at 9:54
    
Instead of adding another function, in your melt.wide function can't you change the line new <- stack.list(str_split(data.melt$variable,sep)) to new <- data.frame(do.call(rbind, (str_split(data.melt$variable, sep))))? I don't know which method would be more efficient. –  Ananda Mahto Apr 16 '12 at 11:24

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