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Hi I have been thinking for hours about a database normalization problem that I am trying to solve. In my problem I have a composite primary key and data in one of the columns of the key has multiple values. Multiple values within one of the columns of the primary key is the major problem. I want to know whether in first normal form only repeating groups other than primary key will be removed or primary key column having multiple values will also be removed. Still may be its nebulous for you people to understand. So I am posting screenshot of the table:

http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=ev47jr&s=5

(Kindly open the image above to see the table)

Here the question I wanna ask is that whether in first normal form only column number 4,5,6,7 will be removed or column number 2 will also be removed (Since it also contains multiple values)?

If I don't remove 2nd column then it won't come in 1NF, but if I remove it too, then it will go to 3NF directly. Help?

Thank you.

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I just want a hint because I know its against your "Ethics" to help in homework. –  Taha Taha Apr 15 '12 at 14:57
    
You can't leave multiple values in any columns in 1NF. –  Joel Brown Apr 16 '12 at 0:39

1 Answer 1

Here the question I wanna ask is that whether in first normal form only column number 4,5,6,7 will be removed or column number 2 will also be removed

All columns containing multiple values will be changed. That includes column 2.

If I don't remove 2nd column then it won't come in 1NF, but if I remove it too, then it will go to 3NF directly.

Normalization doesn't work like this:

  • Determine the structure that is in 1NF, but is not yet in 2NF.
  • Determine the structure that is in 2NF, but is not yet in 3NF.
  • Determine the structure that is in 3NF, but is not yet in BCNF.
  • Determine the structure that is in BCNF, but is not yet in 4NF.
  • Determine the structure that is in 4NF, but is not yet in 5NF.
  • Determine the structure that is in 5NF, but is not yet in 6NF.

The relational model doesn't say that for every relation R that is in 1NF, there exists a decomposition that is in 2NF, but is not yet in 3NF. It just doesn't say that, but this is a common misunderstanding.

In practice, it's not unusual to remove a partial key dependency to get to 2NF, and find the results to be in 5NF.

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