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On the net I found some examples about function objects (callees) but they did not demonstrate how to use them as an argument for a callback function (which calls them, the caller) but merely the way it is used when using sort or for_each. Therefore, I made one myself:

class CBase
{
public:
 virtual int operator()(int a, int b)
 {
  return 10;
 }
};

class CSmaller: public CBase
{
public:
 int operator()(int a, int b)
 {
  return a < b;
 }

 int Compute(int a, int b)
 {
  return a < b;
 }
};

class CLarger: public CBase
{
public:
 int operator()(int a, int b)
 {
  return a > b;
 }

 int Compute(int a, int b)
 {
  return a > b;
 }
};

int caller(CBase &f, int x0, int x1) 
{
 return f(x0,x1);
}

int main()
{
 CLarger callee1; /*this callee is being called by caller*/
 CSmaller callee2; /*idem*/
 int q=caller(callee1,0,1);
 int z=caller(callee2,0,1);
 printf("%d\n",q);
 printf("%d\n",z);
}

Are those STL function objects (like greater Less) implemented in this way (because it often only preceded by a general name/class 'template ')? I.e., do they (CLarger and CSmaller) have a relation/common anchestor with a virtual function being extended for each class or are can they be some general function objects as well (as long as they implement the () operator with two arguments)? Like this (not tested though):

template<class F>
float integrate(const F &f,float x0,float x1) 
{
 ..f(x)..;
}

float derive(const F &f,float x0,float x1) 
{
 ..f(x)..;
}

class CSquare 
{
public:
 float operator()(float x)
 {
  return x*x;
 }
};

class CTwoX 
{
public:
 float operator()(float x)
 {
  return 2*x;
 }
};

If this is the right way, how would these non-related classes be implemented in a non-STL way? I know that using templates for and keeps the underlying mechanism (in that way they are related) but only the type is different. But is such a relation (i.e., same anchestor) required?

Is using an overloaded () in a function object only meant for convenience? Because I can use CLarger's Compute as well. I can also merge those separated classes (that used virtual for their different functionality) in a class CCompute with members Larger and Smaller, for example. BTW, I think I can put derive and integrate in a class as well. Do my qeustions make sense, or do my thoughts contradict the STL theory?

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Note: STL != standard library. –  Griwes Apr 15 '12 at 17:38

2 Answers 2

You can go either way: inheritance or templates. Neither is a requirement, though. The STL functions are templated and that means that as long as the expression f(x) works as required you can pass anything for f (e.g. function pointer, functor -- what you call callee).

Note: f(x) is just an example, the exact number of parameters are dependent on the particuar STL function used.

The advantage of inheritance is that you can encapsulate common behavior in a base class and execute based on the actual type at runtime.

The advantage of templates is that you can use them with any type (based on the template parameter) -- so while you can overload operator() in each class, it might be easier to create a template class that can hanlde each type (using template specialization if special handling is required for certain types)

Note that when you use a template, it creates a different type for each actual template parameter type combination

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The problem is that stdlib algorithms accept functors by value, so object slicing will occur if one attempts to pass in a functor from a pointer/reference to a base class, and consequently virtual functions will not behave polymorphically. For this reason, templates are superior to inheritance. –  ildjarn Apr 15 '12 at 16:46

STL algorithms which accept a function argument (for example, a predicate) will generally not care how the argument is created so long as it matches a "function like" interface; all it needs to do is deduce the type with template argument deduction along the lines of

template< typename FwdIter, typename Pred >
FwdIter find_if( FwdIter first, FwdIter last, Pred pred );

/* .. etc ... */

bool is_equal_to_one(int n) { return n == 1; }

int main()
{
    std::vector<int> foo;
    std::vector<int>::const_iterator iter;
    iter = std::find_if( foo.begin(), foo.end(), is_equal_to_one );
}

There are too many different possible ways for the Pred type to be implemented to do it any other way (a function, a functor, a std::function...). The find_if function will rely on Pred being anything which matches the interface of bool (*FwdIt)

share|improve this answer
    
Note: STL != standard library. –  Griwes Apr 15 '12 at 17:39

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