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I'm having a hard time understanding TBB's enumerable thread specific. I have written this little code to test the TLS

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

#include "tbb/task_scheduler_init.h"
#include "tbb/enumerable_thread_specific.h"
#include "tbb/task.h"

typedef tbb::enumerable_thread_specific< std::vector<int> > TLS;

class Child: public tbb::task {
private:
  int start;
  int limit;
  TLS* local_tls;
public:
  Child( int s_, int l_, TLS* t_):start(s_),limit(l_),local_tls(t_){}
  virtual ~Child(){ 
    local_tls=0;
  }
  tbb::task* execute(){
   TLS::reference local_vector = local_tls->local();
   for(int i=start; i<limit;++i){
   local_vector.push_back( i );
   }
  }
  return 0;
 }
};

class Cont: public tbb::task {
private:
  TLS global_tls;
public:
  Cont(){}
  virtual ~Cont(){}
  TLS* GetTls(void) { return &global_tls; }
  tbb::task* execute(){
    TLS::const_iterator it( global_tls.begin() );
    const TLS::const_iterator end( global_tls.end() );
    std::cout << "ETS.SIZE: " << global_tls.size() << std::endl;
    while( it != end ) {
      std::cout << "*ITSIZE: " << (*it).size() << "\n";
      for( unsigned int j(0); j < (*it).size(); ++j ) {
        std::cout << (*it)[j] << " " << std::endl;
      }  
      ++it;
    }
    return 0;
  }
};

class Root: public tbb::task {
private:
public:
  Root(){}
  virtual ~Root(){}
  tbb::task* execute(){
    tbb::task_list l;
    Cont& c = *new ( allocate_continuation() ) Cont();
    l.push_back( (*new ( c.allocate_child() ) Child(0,10,c.GetTls()) ) );
    l.push_back( (*new ( c.allocate_child() ) Child(11,21,c.GetTls()) ) );
    c.set_ref_count( 2 );
    c.spawn( l );
    return 0;
  }
};

int main(void) {
  Root& r = *new(tbb::task::allocate_root()) Root( );
  tbb::task::spawn_root_and_wait( r ); 
  return 0;
}

but the output is awkward. Sometimes is:

ETS.SIZE: 2
*ITSIZE: 10
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 
*ITSIZE: 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

and sometimes is:

ETS.SIZE: 1
*ITSIZE: 20
0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

Why does that change happens? Also, in the TBB forum I read that sometimes the TLS doesn't contain all of the expected values, but the reason for that is apparently the relationship about parent and child tasks. Didn't understand that too much, though.

Any help?

Thank you.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The 'awkward' output difference you see has nothing to do with enumerable_thread_specific. It's just due to the Child tasks being executed by two different threads (in the case 1) or the same thread (in the case 2).

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer, Alexey. The post in the TBB forum I was talking about is this: software.intel.com/en-us/forums/… In there, the author says this: > However, here comes the problem: in the particle collisions ets, > when getting the b option, the ets doesn't contain all of the > collisions scheduled, only the local data of one of the childs. Could that problem arise here as well? Or did that happen becuase some bad code the author work? –  Adri C.S. Apr 16 '12 at 16:55
1  
I think the author of that TBB forum post misunderstood something. I replied to him there, trying to clarify what he really wants and suggesting some ideas to explore. –  Alexey Kukanov Apr 16 '12 at 22:08
    
Ok! Thanks for your help Alexey! –  Adri C.S. Apr 17 '12 at 9:51

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