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I have a POJO that contains hashcode() and equals() method that I have overridden , but my query is that what about If i make hashcode() method comment then in collection lets say in a hashmap when I am storing the user defined objects then what impact would it have...and another thing is that if I make equals method as a comment then what Impact would it have If I try to enter duplicate records will it store duplicate records twice!

public class Employee {

 String name,job;
 int salary;

 public Employee(String n , String j, int t )
 {
     this.name= n;
     this.job=j;
     this.salary= t;         
 }

/* @Override
public int hashCode() {
    final int prime = 31;
    int result = 1;
    result = prime * result + ((job == null) ? 0 : job.hashCode());
    result = prime * result + ((name == null) ? 0 : name.hashCode());
    result = prime * result + salary;
    return result;
}*/

 /*@Override
public boolean equals(Object obj) {
    if (this == obj)
        return true;
    if (obj == null)
        return false;
    if (getClass() != obj.getClass())
        return false;
    Employee other = (Employee) obj;
    if (job == null) {
        if (other.job != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!job.equals(other.job))
        return false;
    if (name == null) {
        if (other.name != null)
            return false;
    } else if (!name.equals(other.name))
        return false;
    if (salary != other.salary)
        return false;
    return true;
}
 */

 @Override
 public int hashCode()
     {       
     return name.hashCode()+job.hashCode()+salary;       

 }

 @Override
    public boolean equals(Object obj) {  
     if (this == obj)  
    {  
        return true;   
    }  
    // make sure o can be cast to this class  
    if (obj == null || obj.getClass() != getClass())  
    {  
        // cannot cast  
        return false;  
    }           

     Employee e = (Employee) obj;   
     return this.name.equals(e.name)&&this.job.equals(e.job)&&this.salary==e.salary;
 }

 @Override
 public String toString() {
        return name+"\t" +"\t"+  job +"\t"+ salary;
    }
}
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1  
You're talking about the impact when you comment equals() and hasCode() methods alternatively. Didn't you notice by yourself what happens when you comment them out alternatively (or possibly both together)? –  Lion Apr 15 '12 at 18:43

3 Answers 3

If you leave out equals, it will use the Object.equals method, which is true only if both objects are the same instance.

Thus, duplicate objects won't be added, but duplicate records may be added, if you add the same data through different object instances.

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Once you comment something out, it isn't compiled and won't have any effect on the rest of your program.

Also, not overriding the Object.equals() method means that equals() will only return true when the two objects are the same instance. For example:

int[] data = data; //data to create object
mObject o1 = new mObject(data); //new object from data
mObject o2 = new mObject(data); //another object from the same data
System.out.println(o1.equals(o2)); //prints false even though o1 and o2 contain the same information.
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No matter what you do or don't comment out, the same object (address-wise) can't be added twice to a set. (For any sane definition of equals() and hashCode()).

When you have two objects o1 and o2 that "mean" the same thing (have the same data):

If you comment out hashCode(), you (almost always) will be able to add both to the same HashSet, even if equals() says that the two objects are the same (or as keys to the same HashMap). This is because all the hash-based data structures compare objects by hashcode first then by equals().

If you comment out equals() without commenting hashCode(), all collections will behave as if the objects are not equal. This is because even the hash-based comparisons check equals() after checking hashCode(), since hash collisions can occur even in proper implementations of hashCode() and equals().

share|improve this answer
    
First sentence is highly misleading. "same object" with reference to collections is completely defined by hashCode() and equals(). It would be possible, though foolhardy, to define these to return different values for the "same object". –  Jim Garrison Apr 15 '12 at 19:17
    
Edited to clear that up. –  trutheality Apr 15 '12 at 19:42

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