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I'm trying to subclass web.form.Form from the webpy framework to change the behavior (it renders from in a table). I tried doing it in this way:

class SyssecForm(web.form.Form):

            def __init__(self, *inputs, **kw): 
                super(SyssecForm, self).__init__(*inputs, **kw)

            def render(self):
                out='<div id="form"> '
                for i in self.inputs:
                    html = utils.safeunicode(i.pre) + i.render() + self.rendernote(i.note) + utils.safeunicode(i.post)
                    out +=  "%s"%(html)  
                    out +=  '"<div id="%s"> %s %s</div>'% (i.id, net.websafe(i.description), html)
                out+= "</div>"
                return out

Now I'm getting this error object.__init__() takes no parameters:

error traceback

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I recommend against using super() in situations where the methods aren't specifically designed for the use with super(). Especially __init__() is almost never designed to work well with super(), so you should better use an explicit base class call web.form.Form.__init__(self, ...). –  Sven Marnach Apr 15 '12 at 20:05
1  
@Sven that depends on whether it's a "new style" or "old style" class. You should always use super with new style classes (that inherit from "object"), but never with old style classes. –  Keith Apr 15 '12 at 20:09
    
It's python 2.7, so still old style I guess –  Lucas Kauffman Apr 15 '12 at 20:11

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This works for me (web.py 0.37):

import web

class SyssecForm(web.form.Form):

    def __init__(self, *inputs, **kw): 
        super(SyssecForm, self).__init__(*inputs, **kw)

    def render(self):
        out='<div id="form"> '
        for i in self.inputs:
            html = web.utils.safeunicode(i.pre) + i.render() + self.rendernote(i.note) + web.utils.safeunicode(i.post)
            out +=  "%s"%(html)  
            out +=  '"<div id="%s"> %s %s</div>'% (i.id, web.net.websafe(i.description), html)
        out+= "</div>"
        return out

form = SyssecForm(web.form.Textbox("test"))
print form.render()

Your problem is because you might have outdated web.py, since web.form.Form inherits from object now: https://github.com/webpy/webpy/commit/766709cbcae1369126a52aee4bc3bf145b5d77a8

Super only works for new-style classes. You have to add object in class delcaration like this: class SyssecForm(web.form.Form, object): or you have to update web.py.

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Yes but what's the difference with calling your subbed class the same as your super class? I should be calling the same method no? –  Lucas Kauffman Apr 16 '12 at 8:13
    
Check my answer, I think I got it right. –  Andrey Kuzmin Apr 16 '12 at 14:59

Just remove your __init__ method altogether, since you aren't really doing anything there, anyway.

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While it is certainly true that the __init__() method is pointless, how should removing it make a difference? The code should do exactly the same thing without this method, which is, throw an error. –  Sven Marnach Apr 15 '12 at 19:56
    
Oh right, and don't instantiate it with any arguments. Or don't all super method at all. It's hard to tell what the intent is here. –  Keith Apr 15 '12 at 20:02
    
It's true, the init method doesn't do anything in the end. I just do not understand why it error's. The Form class does have the same init method with the same arguments. –  Lucas Kauffman Apr 15 '12 at 20:05
    
@LucasKauffman: You never know what super() ends up calling – see my comment above. –  Sven Marnach Apr 15 '12 at 20:06
    
@SvenMarnach removing it did fix it though :/ –  Lucas Kauffman Apr 15 '12 at 20:09

The message tells you all you need to know. The super-class is object and its constructor takes no parameters. So don't pass it the parameters for your constructor since it doesn't know what to do with them.

Call it like this:

super(SyssecForm, self).__init__()
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2  
Hmm, looks like the superclass actually is web.form.Form. –  Sven Marnach Apr 15 '12 at 19:47
    
@sven the error message is pretty clear cut –  David Heffernan Apr 15 '12 at 19:48
    
Unfortunately not. I'm not saying you are wrong, I'm just saying that I don't understand what's happening yet. –  Sven Marnach Apr 15 '12 at 19:51
    
I removed it and it works kinda, still some bugs but don't know if it's related. I thought by stating class SyssecForm(web.form.Form) that I inherited from this class. Are am I wrong? thx for the fast answer :) –  Lucas Kauffman Apr 15 '12 at 19:55
1  
@sven perhaps OP is just a little confused. If that init is right then it is pointless. If it needs to receive parameters then it's missing a body. –  David Heffernan Apr 15 '12 at 20:01

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