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I've just got my feet wet with multi-threading and its really awesome. I find myself trying to figure out new ways I can use it make things better and I think I found one but I'm unsure how to design the program for this.

Here's the situation. I have a queue server that multiple clients consume and produce data to but to kick start the process I run a java program on to put some initial data for them to start. then my program is done and I have excess capacity on the queue server but nothing is really running on it. So I want to try to do some maintenance tasks, run a service, and do low priority stuff.I'm not sure how do that though. How do I design a program that does completely different tasks concurrently?

Typically I just wrap my programs in a while (true) loop and it does a single task and I realize I cannot do two while loops at the same time in the same process(maybe nested?). To show a simplified example, I put a bunch of code that runs a runnable(maybe it'll process a low priority queue) and a service that monitors a socket and replies back(I might want to add more depending on cpu usage). How do I get them all to work together? Is there a better way to design it(I know long term its probably better to run multiple java processes but right now I am just trying to manage a single file and I suspect there's a way to give the socket service a higher priority than processing the queue within the file but if they are both running in different files I don't know how to lower one over the other instead of them fighting for resources)?

Thanks and I'll edit this question if it turns out I'm explaining this totally wrong. But in a nutshell, I want it to provide a service to other systems(server socket, in the example) and when its idle I want it to do a few other tasks.

Example(if you understand what I'm asking this code may not be necessary to read):

import java.io.IOException;
import java.io.ObjectInputStream;
import java.io.ObjectOutputStream;
import java.net.ServerSocket;
import java.net.Socket;


public class multipleThreads {

    private ServerSocket server;
    private int port = 7777;

    public void ServerSocketExample() {
        try {
            server = new ServerSocket(port);
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        System.out.println("starting");

        ServerSocketExample example = new ServerSocketExample();
        example.handleConnection();

        while (true) {
            //monitor low low priority queue
        }       
    }
    public void handleConnection() {
        System.out.println("Waiting for client message...");

        //
        // The server do a loop here to accept all connection initiated by the
        // client application.
        //
        while (true) {
            try {
                Socket socket = server.accept();
                new ConnectionHandler(socket);
            } catch (IOException e) {
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        }
    }

}

class ConnectionHandler implements Runnable {
    private Socket socket;

    public ConnectionHandler(Socket socket) {
        this.socket = socket;

        Thread t = new Thread(this);
        t.start();
    }

    public void run() {
        try
        {
            //
            // Read a message sent by client application
            //
            ObjectInputStream ois = new ObjectInputStream(socket.getInputStream());
            String message = (String) ois.readObject();
            System.out.println("Message Received: " + message);

            //
            // Send a response information to the client application
            //
            ObjectOutputStream oos = new ObjectOutputStream(socket.getOutputStream());
            oos.writeObject("Hi...");

            ois.close();
            oos.close();
            socket.close();

            System.out.println("Waiting for client message...");
        } catch (IOException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (ClassNotFoundException e) {
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }
}

class MonitorQueue implements Runnable{

    @Override
    public void run() {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        //do work when stuff comes in the queue

    }

}
share|improve this question
    
What have you tried?; e.g. Search? –  nobeh Apr 15 '12 at 20:27
    
Thread.setPriority(int)? –  cHao Apr 15 '12 at 20:27
    
@nobeh I've tried to code it but having two while loops don't work, and I wash't sure how to adjust priority of tasks –  Error_404 Apr 15 '12 at 20:30
    
@cHao Thanks I'll try that. –  Error_404 Apr 15 '12 at 20:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I strongly recommend you take a look at this project: Java Concurrent Animated. I found this probably the best way to get my head around concurrency concepts in Java: it's animated, interactive, and you can just take one concept at a time and get a good understanding.

http://sourceforge.net/projects/javaconcurrenta/

share|improve this answer
    
+1. Nice program. –  Radu Murzea Apr 15 '12 at 20:50
    
Thanks for the plug! –  Victor Grazi Apr 22 '12 at 4:01

Take a look at the java.util.concurrent package. It's full off goodies for doing exactly the kinds of things you describe.

In particular, check out the Executors factory class which lets you build Thread Pools that allow multiple tasks to be scheduled and run concurrently on any number of Threads you specify.

Oracle has some great tutorials on using Executors:

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/executors.html

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/concurrency/exinter.html

share|improve this answer
    
ahh..so I can have one thread monitoring different things(in a while loop for example) then based on the item send it to Executors to launch different tasks? can I set number of threads or priority for tasks? like a heavy task may get more threads and higher priority over a lower one? –  Error_404 Apr 15 '12 at 20:35
    
When you add a Runnable to an Executor Runnable.run() will be executed on a single Thread managed by the Executor (which might have many such Threads executing many different Runnables). If you want your task to be automatically split up among multiple threads, that's a whole different ball of wax and a question in-and-of itself (there are c libraries like OpenMP which handle automatic parallelization of loops, but I'm not familiar with anything like that for Java) –  ulmangt Apr 15 '12 at 21:58
    
As far as controlling thread priority, look at the [ThreadPoolExecutor constructor](docs.oracle.com/javase/1.5.0/docs/api/java/util/concurrent/…, int, long, java.util.concurrent.TimeUnit, java.util.concurrent.BlockingQueue, java.util.concurrent.ThreadFactory)) which take a ThreadFactory as an argument. You could create two ThreadPoolExecutors with different ThreadFactories which create threads with different priorities. –  ulmangt Apr 15 '12 at 22:02
    
Then simply add your high priority tasks to the one executor, your low priority ones to the other. –  ulmangt Apr 15 '12 at 22:02

Concurrency is hard, you can read Java Concurrency in Practice, but even the experts have difficulties. Look for a training course in your area. I would like to recommend Concurrency Specialist Courses which is based on Java Concurrency in Practice and endorsed by the author, Brian Goetz

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