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I have this code to get "A" as a filtered result.

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    Base xbase = new Base(); 
    A a = new A(); 
    B b = new B();
    IEnumerable<Base> list = new List<Base>() { xbase, a, b };
    Base f = list.OfType<A>().FirstOrDefault();
    Console.WriteLine(f);
}

I need to use IEnumerable<Base> list = new List<Base>() {xbase, a, b}; from a function as follows:

public static Base Method(IEnumerable<Base> list, Base b (????)) // I'm not sure I need Base b parameter for this?
{
    Base f = list.OfType<????>().FirstOrDefault();
    return f;
}

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    Base xbase = new Base(); 
    A a = new A(); 
    B b = new B();
    IEnumerable<Base> list = new List<Base>() { xbase, a, b };
    //Base f = list.OfType<A>().FirstOrDefault();
    Base f = Method(list);
    Console.WriteLine(f);
}

What parameter do I use in '????' to get the same result from the original code?

share|improve this question
5  
You can't call Method(list) - list isn't a Base, it's an IEnumerable<Base>. That's the second time you've made that error - how comfortable are you with IEnumerable<T>? And is Method always meant to return an A value? If so, why is it declared to return Base, and why can't you just use A instead of ???? ? –  Jon Skeet Apr 15 '12 at 20:31
    
@Jon: The parameter of Method() should have been IEnumerable<Base> list, Base b. For ????, I need to get the type A from the second parameter. I tried with (Base b) as the parameter, and b.GetType() in <????>, but it doesn't work as b.GetType() return Type not Base. –  prosseek Apr 15 '12 at 20:40
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It seems like you are looking for a generic way to do what is in Method based on different children types of Base. You can do that with:

public static Base Method<T>(IEnumerable<Base> b) where T: Base
{
    Base f = list.OfType<T>().FirstOrDefault();
    return f;
}

This will return the first instance from b that is of type T (which has to be a child of Base).

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1  
Note that although this was accepted, it doesn't conform to what the question actually asked for - namely getting the type from a parameter value. It's a somewhat confused question, admittedly... –  Jon Skeet Apr 15 '12 at 20:48
1  
My original answer was far less sure of what they were asking, and apparently correctly so. It was my attempt at trying to do something useful. Hopefully it actually helped. :) –  M.Babcock Apr 15 '12 at 20:51
    
@M.Babcock - This is exactly what I wanted. Thanks. –  prosseek Apr 16 '12 at 16:19
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If you want to query on a type, you can try something like this:

public static Base Method(IEnumerable<Base> list, Type typeToFind)
{
   Base f =  (from l in list  
       where l.GetType()== typeToFind 
               select l).FirstOrDefault();
   return f;
}

If it's not what you are searching for, please clarify.

share|improve this answer
    
@M.Babcock: Do you mean OfType, or typeof? –  Jon Skeet Apr 15 '12 at 20:44
1  
Isn't that what OfType<T> already does? –  M.Babcock Apr 15 '12 at 20:45
    
@JonSkeet - Edited (or rather reposted because I didn't catch it in time). –  M.Babcock Apr 15 '12 at 20:46
1  
@M.Babcock: Okay - in which case I can answer by saying that no, they're actually different for subtypes; and for OfType you have to know T at compile-time. You can't use OfType<typeToFind>. –  Jon Skeet Apr 15 '12 at 20:47
    
@JonSkeet - Thanks for the clarification. I don't know that I've ever used it myself in practice. That actually makes it less useful than I had assumed it was. –  M.Babcock Apr 15 '12 at 20:49
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