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My database is stored in a sql server 2005 db.

This query takes less than one second to execute:

SELECT * FROM ( 

SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,   
SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price
FROM tblOrders 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid

) as x
where RowNum >=  21001 and RowNum <  21011

while this queries takes 10 seconds to execute:

SELECT * FROM ( 

SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,   
SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price, 
OrderDate
FROM tblOrders 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid, tblOrders.OrderDate

) as x
where RowNum >=  21001 and RowNum <  21011

Why might there be such a difference?

All tables have a column called id which holds the primary key. Not sure why orderid and ProductId exist also since I didn't design the database.

/Barry

UPDATE

OrderDate is a datetime

SECOND UPDATE

Remember, the three tables each have an id column which acts as the primary key. However, orderid, productid, etc are used when referencing between tables. I'm not sure why it was implemented this way, but I'm guessing its very much wrong.

tblOrders:
Id; int; no null; PK
OrderId; int; allow null
OrderDate; datetime; allow null

tblOrderDetails:
Id; int; no null; PK
OrderId; int; allow null
ProductId; int; allow null

tblProducts:
Id; int; PK; no null
ProductId; allow null
Price; money; allow null

Is this adequate re a query execution plan?-

enter image description here

THIRD UPDATE

This only takes one second to execute -

SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,   
SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price, 
OrderDate
FROM tblOrders 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid, OrderDate

and this only 2 seconds -

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,
  SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price,
  MAX(tblOrders.OrderDate) as OrderDate  -- do this instead of grouping
FROM tblOrders
  LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId
  LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid  ) as x

But this takes 10 seconds --

SELECT * FROM (
  SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,
  SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price,
  MAX(tblOrders.OrderDate) as OrderDate  -- do this instead of grouping
FROM tblOrders
  LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId
  LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid  ) as x
where RowNum >=  21001 and RowNum <  21011

The where clause is adding 8 seconds. Why?

share|improve this question
    
Please post screenshots of the two execution plans. –  usr Apr 15 '12 at 21:12
    
Or the actual plans somewhere... Much more useful than screenshots which contain little info other than the operators. Also make sure they are actual plans and not estimated plans. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 15 '12 at 23:12
    
Do you have indexes on your tables? Which? –  oryol Apr 16 '12 at 19:40
    
Just the primary keys which are clustered indexes. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 20:30

4 Answers 4

I'd bet you dollars to doughnuts that including "tblOrders.OrderDate" in both the output list and the grouping clause is causing your slow-down. I suggest you SET STATISTICS IO ON and run the two queries, and see how you get different scans & seeks on each table.

Very likely the SQL engine has a dramatically different plan for the 2nd query that takes into account the OrderDate column, resulting in either more CPU processing or (more likely) lots more disk IO.

share|improve this answer
    
IO stats won't tell you anything. Those are just logical IOs. You know nothing about their cache status and size. We really need to look at the plan. –  usr Apr 15 '12 at 21:38
    
And this inclusion of date leads to table scan for each order id as date fields are seldom indexed. One order id should have one order date so inclusion of order date is un necessary i think. –  Deb Apr 16 '12 at 2:17
    
@usr logical IO can be very informative for finding errors such as missing indexes and wrong order of the operations within an execution plan. It is highly likely that this problem is one of those. +1 to jklemmack. –  David B Apr 16 '12 at 18:17
    
You don't find those from the IO stats, you find those from the execution plan. Only the plan can tell if the amount of IO was appropriate for the query. –  usr Apr 16 '12 at 18:52

Without actual table structure and execution plans I can't answer exactly but if orderid is unique in tblOrders than it will be better to remove OrderDate from group by statement and in select list add it as min(tblOrders.OrderDate) as OrderDate. It should give same result (if tblOrders.orderid is unique key) but work much better.

share|improve this answer
    
This takes 11 seconds to execute. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 18:53

What is OrderDate? datetime? While those queries look very similar, I suspect OrderDate includes time information, so the sorting and grouping is much more expensive (and lead to many more rows in the subquery for the second query).

Consider the following change:

SELECT RowNum, price, DD = DATEADD(DAY, DD, '19000101') FROM (     
SELECT  ROW_NUMBER() OVER ( ORDER BY tblOrders.orderid ) AS RowNum,   
SUM(tblProducts.Price) as price, 
DATEDIFF(DAY, '19000101', tblOrders.OrderDate) as DD
FROM tblOrders 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblOrderDetails ON tblOrders.orderid = tblOrderDetails.OrderId 
LEFT OUTER JOIN tblProducts ON tblOrderDetails.ProductId = tblProducts.ProductId
GROUP BY tblOrders.orderid, DATEDIFF(DAY, '19000101', tblOrders.OrderDate)

) as x
where RowNum >=  21001 and RowNum <  21011
ORDER BY RowNum;

In SQL Server 2008 or better you could simplify that to CONVERT(DATE, OrderDate)...

share|improve this answer
    
I replaced DD = (DAY, DD, '19000101') with dd, as it won't run otherwise. This query also took 10 secs. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 17:52
    
You'll need to post execution plans somewhere if you want assistance in tracing any bottlenecks in this query. I could make all kinds of guesses but that isn't a good use of anyone's time. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 16 '12 at 17:56
    
Thanks, I've now added the plan. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 18:11
    
It seems like the only thing missing to help your query is an index on OrderDate - while the MIN/MAX or CONVERT are good ways to eliminate the time from those values, the index will still be useful for the Sort operator in your original query. –  Aaron Bertrand Apr 16 '12 at 18:20
    
I added an index for tblOrders.OrderDate but it had no impact re execution time. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 18:32

This cannot be answered without executions plans, but I can guess:

  • The additional column might prevent use of an index
  • The cardinality of the slow query is very high
  • The statistics for OrderDate are somehow out of date (exec sp_updatestats)

Update: The execution plan that you posts is horrific indeed.

Create indexes:

create unique nonclustered index x0 on tblOrder(orderid) include (OrderDate)
create unique nonclustered index x1 on tblProduct (productid) include (Price)
create nonclustered index x2 on tblOrderDetails(orderid, ProductId)
share|improve this answer
    
Added execution plan. –  Baz Apr 16 '12 at 18:47
    
I added my recommendation. If this does not fix your problem, please also post the execution plan of the fast query (as screenshot and as XML). –  usr Apr 16 '12 at 19:02

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