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In Ruby there are several ways to declare a class method.

We have these two forms...

class Dog

  def self.species
    puts "I'm a dog."
  end

  def Dog.species_rly?
    puts "Still a dog."
  end

end

And this other, longer form...

class Dog
  class << self
    def species_srsly?
      puts "OK, fine. I'm a cat."
    end
  end
end

Why is the last form used? How is it better than just doing this?

class Dog
  def Dog.some_method
    # ...
  end
end
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2  
Dog.species is problematic if you change the class name later. Better use self.species. –  Niklas B. Apr 15 '12 at 21:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

class << self is the least repetitive. def Dog.meth repeats "Dog" all over the class, and def self.meth repeats "self".

The extra indentation might also be a visual indicator that you're in your singleton-ish class methods and not your regular instantiated methods.

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This wonderful book says that the three syntaxes are identical. Which one to choose is a matter of personal preference. It also says that class name syntax (def Dog.some_method) is frowned upon by Ruby community. And I can see why: you're duplicating information without a reason. Should you rename your class, you'll have to update all method definitions as well.

So, you're free to choose between the remaining two syntaxes :)

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You'll find that the class << self form is only longer when you're dealing with a small number of methods. If you are going to write, say, 15 class methods, suddenly it's a lot clearer and a lot less repetitive.

At the end of the day it's a matter or personal style which you use.

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There is absolutely no difference, and it's ultimately a matter of preference. Some like the latter because it brings all the "class" methods into a single block and avoids having to write self. in each method definition.

The former makes the fact that each method is a "class" method explicit in each definition.

I don't think I would ever use the Dog.some_method, as it makes refactoring more difficult than self.some_method.

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Technical there is no difference (at least I know none).

I avoid

class Dog
  def Dog.species_rly?
    puts "Still a dog."
  end
end

If I change the class name, I have to change it in each method definition. Same, if I copy a method from one to another class (if you do so, think first, if you should define a module and inlcude it).

If I have one or two methods I use:

class Dog

  def self.species
    puts "I'm a dog."
  end

end

If I have more class methods, then I first think why. Class methods are often just a hint for bad design - perhaps you need another (singleton?) class.

If I decide to define multiple class methods I use:

class Dog
  class << self
    def species_srsly?
      puts "OK, fine. I'm a cat."
    end
  end
end

Sometimes I separate the class methods in a sourcefile and put the instance methods in another sourcefile.

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In the class Dog, self is the 'Dog' class (every class has a 'class' object, sometimes called a meta-class or eigenclass).

In a tricky way, all methods in ruby are instance methods.

def self.species

is declaring a species method on the 'class class', which makes it (behave like) a class method.

Similarly,

d = Dog.new
def d.bark; puts "woof"; end

adds a method to the 'd' instance

As to the difference between

class << self
  def species

and

def self.species

they functionally accomplish the same thing. Choosing one format over the other, as mentioned in others, is stylistic. def self.species is the usual one for declaring 'class' methods.

I mostly would use

class << self
  attr_accessor :species
end

if I were to want to make an attribute accessor operate on the class level, rather than instance.

Understanding this is important to using hooks like the module included

module Sound
  def self.included(host_class)
    def host_class.speak(sound)
      define_method(:bark) do
        sound
      end
    end
  end
end
class Dog
  include Sound
  speak "woof"
end
Dog.new.bark

Also, for completeness

class Dog
  def self.species
    puts self.to_s
  end
  def Dog.bark
    puts self.to_s
  end
end
class Spaniel < Dog; end

The species method is defined on the self of any subclasses, whereas the :bark method is always defined on Dog (unless overwritten)

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