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I'm trying to parse a string manually by spaces without using strtok() or anything from string.h. Does this look like the right approach? When I try this, I keep skipping right past the end of the string.

  char cmd[1024];
  int ret = read(STDIN, cmd, 1023);
  cmd[ret-1] = '\0';

     char * args[128];
     int length = 0;
     char * startptr = cmd;
     char * endptr = cmd;

     while(1){
        if(*startptr == '\n' || *startptr == '\0'){
           break;
        }
        if(*startptr == ' '){
           startptr ++;
           endptr ++;
           continue;
        }
        // startptr is placed
        if(*endptr != '\0' || *endptr != '\n' || *endptr != ' '){
           endptr ++;
           continue;
        }
        // both pointers placed
        char * i = startptr;
        for(i = startptr; i != endptr; i++){
           args[length][i-startptr] = *i;
        }
        length ++;
        startptr = endptr;
        if(*endptr == '\0' || *endptr == '\n'){
           break;
        }

     }
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1  
Have you tried stepping though with a debugger? –  Matt Ball Apr 15 '12 at 21:32

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

No is not right.Logical expressions must be 'and' not 'or'.
checking for limitations would be good, some times will may interesting effect like 'change ARG_MAX_LEN to 2' you get the first character of every word. Probably this code will work.

 char cmd[1024];
 int ret = readf(cmd, 1, 1023, stdin);

 char args[128][ARG_MAX_LEN]; //two dimensional array 
 int length = 0;
 char * startptr = cmd;
 char * endptr = cmd;
 char *ap, *aep;
 if(ret > 0)
   cmd[ret-1] = '\0';
 else
   cmd[0] = '\0';
 while(*startptr != '\n' && *startptr != '\0')
 {
    if(*startptr == ' '){
       endptr = ++startptr ;
       continue;
    }
    // startptr is placed
    if(*endptr != '\0' && *endptr != '\n' && *endptr != ' '){
       endptr ++;
       continue;
    }
    // both pointers placed
    ap = &args[length][0];
    aep = ap + ARG_MAX_LEN - 1;
    while(startptr != endptr && ap != &args[length+1])
      *ap++ = *startptr++;
    if(length >= 128)
       break;
    length ++;
    startptr = endptr;
 }

If you are want to get command line arguments you should look for character escaping as well.

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Thanks! I think it was the max length thing that did it for me. –  theeggman85 Apr 16 '12 at 1:03
if(*endptr != '\0' || *endptr != '\n' || *endptr != ' '){

you should be using && here:

if(*endptr != '\0' && *endptr != '\n' && *endptr != ' '){

You're also not allocating args[length], so you'll probably get a segfault when you try to write there. You need to allocate space with malloc first, or use a 2d array.

You also have an off by one error here:

cmd[ret-1] = '\0';

-1 will make it overwrite the last character in the buffer, or worse if the file is empty it will write to cmd[-1].

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You approach is not right, but neither (in my opinion) is the answer you accepted (sorry user1333967).

Apart from the logic errors already pointed out, you have nested loops. They almost always indicate badly thought-out code and should be avoided (there are cases where they are sensible, but this isn't one).

Functions are your friend, especially for string handling. If you don't want to use the standard library's strtok, strcpy, strchr etc, (for some strange reason - homework perhaps?) write your own. They are quite easy to write, will simplify you code and will make it readable. Ignore anyone who complains about function call overheads; 99% of the time they are unimportant.

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