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i have this try except code:

document = raw_input ('Your document name is ')

try:
    with open(document, 'r') as a:
        for element in a:
           print element

except:
    print document, 'does not exist'

my question is, how do i exit the program after I print filename does not exist? break and pass don't work obviously. and i don't want to have any crashing error, so sys.exit is not an option. please kindly ignore the try part because it's just a dummy :)

thanks!

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3 Answers 3

Use the sys.exit:

import sys

try:
    # do something
except Exception, e:
    print >> sys.stderr, "does not exist"
    print >> sys.stderr, "Exception: %s" % str(e)
    sys.exit(1)

A good practice is to print the Exception that occured so you can debug afterwards.

You can also print the stacktrace with the traceback module.

Note that the int you return in sys.exit will be the return code of your program. To see what exit code your program returned (which will give you information about what happens and can be automated), you can do:

echo $?
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You can also put your code in a function and issue a return. You may call it main which you can call from your script.

def main():
    document = raw_input ('Your document name is ')

    try:
        with open(document, 'r') as a:
            for element in a:
               print element

    except:
        print document, 'does not exist'
        return

if __name__ == "__main__":
    main()
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The problem with "return" in case of exceptions is that you won't see any error code on the command line. If you have monitoring systems, they will typically check logs as well as return code of your program, so if the program returns 0 in all cases even errors it can be tricky to maintain. –  Charles Menguy Apr 15 '12 at 22:32
    
@linker You can still print an error message before returning. Not all programs need to produce output for other programs -- sometimes, just being human readable is plenty. –  agf Apr 15 '12 at 22:34
1  
@agf I'm just explaining what I've found to be most useful in real-world context, the best is to have both human readable and consistent return code convention. –  Charles Menguy Apr 15 '12 at 22:38
    
@linker Another common convention is to return exitcode from main and then sys.exit(main()) or similar. That way, you have a single sys.exit, and you have better separation in your code. –  agf Apr 15 '12 at 22:42
    
Good point, thanks for sharing it ! –  Charles Menguy Apr 15 '12 at 22:46

Using

sys.exit(1)

is not a crashing error, it's a perfectly normal way to exit a program. The exit code of 1 is a convention that means something went wrong (you would return 0 in the case of a successful run).

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Out of curiousity, is there anything wrong with using quit()? Nobody seems to mention that one. –  Joel Cornett Apr 15 '12 at 22:54
1  
quit() is only intended to work in the interactive Python shell. I wouldn't use it in a program. It's not listed on docs.python.org/library/functions.html and I wouldn't expect it to be portable to other Python implementations. –  Greg Hewgill Apr 15 '12 at 23:07

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