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I'm trying to remove one line from a text file. Instead, what I have wipes out the entire file. Can someone point out the error?

removeReservation("john");

sub removeTime() {
    my $name = shift;

    open( FILE, "<times.txt" );
    @LINES = <FILE>;
    close(FILE);
    open( FILE, ">times.txt" );
    foreach $LINE (@LINES) {
        print NEWLIST $LINE unless ( $LINE =~ m/$name/ );
    }
    close(FILE);
    print("Reservation successfully removed.<br/>");
}

Sample times.txt file:

04/15/2012&08:00:00&bob
04/15/2012&08:00:00&john
share|improve this question
    
Always use warnings;. –  geekosaur Apr 15 '12 at 23:03
    
@geekosaur I'm not getting anything from warnings.. –  varatis Apr 15 '12 at 23:09
1  
Then your output is going somewhere other than where it should be. Check where you're writing it. –  geekosaur Apr 15 '12 at 23:11
    
@geekosaur, the real program probably uses NEWLIST somewhere else, which means you don't get the "used only once" warning. I would expect a "print() on unopened filehandle" warning, but maybe it was open, and he just didn't notice the output was in that file. –  cjm Apr 15 '12 at 23:48
    
@cjm, yes, that was the point of the later ("not going where you think") comment. –  geekosaur Apr 15 '12 at 23:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It looks like you're printing to a filehandle which you have not yet defined. At least you haven't defined it in your sample code. If you enable strict and warnings, you'll get the following message:

Name "main::NEWLIST" used only once: possible typo at remove.pl line 16.

print NEWLIST $LINE unless ($LINE =~ m/$name/);

This code should work for you:

#!/usr/bin/env perl 

use strict; 
use warnings; 

removeTime( "john" ); 

sub removeTime { 
    my $name = shift; 

    open( FILE, "<times.txt" ); 
    my @LINES = <FILE>; 
    close( FILE ); 
    open( FILE, ">times.txt" ); 
    foreach my $LINE ( @LINES ) { 
        print FILE $LINE unless ( $LINE =~ m/$name/ ); 
    } 
    close( FILE ); 
    print( "Reservation successfully removed.<br/>" ); 
}

A couple of other things to note:

1) Your sample code calls removeReservation() when you mean removeTime()

2) You don't require the round brackets in your subroutine definition unless your intention is to use prototypes. See my example above.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this concept, i was struggling to do read and update line in one file handle! –  a7omiton Aug 19 at 22:23

This is in the FAQ.

How do I change, delete, or insert a line in a file, or append to the beginning of a file?

It's always worth checking the FAQ.

share|improve this answer

Oalder's answer is correct, but he should have tested whether the open statements succeeded or not. If the file times.txt doesn't exist, your program would continue on its merry way without a word of warning that something terrible has happened.

Same program as oalders' but:

  1. Testing the results of the open.
  2. Using the three part open statement which is more goof proof. If your file name begins with > or |, your program will fail with the old two part syntax.
  3. Not using global file handles -- especially in subroutines. File handles are normally global in scope. Imagine if I had a file handle named FILE in my main program, and I was reading it, I called this subroutine. That would cause problems. Use locally scoped file handle names.
  4. Variable names should be in lowercase. Constants are all uppercase. It's just a standard that developed over time. Not following it can cause confusion.
  5. Since oalders put the program in a subroutine, you should pass the name of your file in the subroutine as well...

Here's the program:

#!/usr/bin/env perl 

use strict; 
use warnings; 

removeTime( "john", "times.txt" ); 

sub removeTime { 
    my $name      = shift;
    my $time_file = shift;

    if (not defined $time_file) {
        #Make sure that the $time_file was passed in too.
        die qq(Name of Time file not passed to subroutine "removeTime"\n);
    }

    # Read file into an array for processing
    open( my $read_fh, "<", $time_file )
       or die qq(Can't open file "$time_file" for reading: $!\n); 

    my @file_lines = <$read_fh>; 
    close( $read_fh ); 

    # Rewrite file with the line removed
    open( my $write_fh, ">", $time_file )
        or die qq(Can't open file "$time_file" for writing: $!\n);

    foreach my $line ( @file_lines ) { 
        print {$write_fh} $line unless ( $line =~ /$name/ ); 
    } 
    close( $write_fh ); 

    print( "Reservation successfully removed.<br/>" ); 
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is stylistically better than my answer. IIRC I just changed the minimum amount of code to get the example working but the 3 arg open and checking to see if the open succeeded are key if you really want to clean things up. Using autodie and or File::Slurp could really cut down on the code as well, but this is a far more thorough response than my own. –  oalders Nov 27 '13 at 6:01
perl -ni -e 'print unless /whatever/' filename
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