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I've encountered an issue using the regex function exec() in Firefox 10 and 11.

The function seems to behave erratic when it is called a lot. Among the correct result, it also returns null a lot. From Safari 5.1.3, Chrome 18 and the above mentioned Firefox versions, I can see the issue only within Firefox.

I've created a JSFiddle to demonstrate the problem: http://jsfiddle.net/KSH3S/ , source:

var i, x = "";

for (i = 0; i < 10000; i++) {
    var matches = /foo/g.exec('sdkfjfooasdknal');
    x += matches + "<br>";
}

$('body').html(x);

In my two Firefox versions, this returns 40x foo, 1x null, 41x foo, and from then on it swaps between these two on every single call.

Have you encountered this?

Thanks Valentin

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What happens if it is invoked using the same regex object? (e.g. var foo = /foo/g outside the loop) –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:15
1  
What problem are you actually trying to solve? Calling exec() repeatedly on a regular expression with the "g" flag accumulates some state from one call to the next to allow you to find multiple matches in the same source string. –  jfriend00 Apr 16 '12 at 0:18
    
@jfriend00 But it's a new regex object in this case, and even if that were the case, it should be a predictable pattern. The issue is that FF behaves erratically. –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:19
    
@pst - Are you sure it's a new regex object? JS has function scope, not block scope. –  jfriend00 Apr 16 '12 at 0:20
    
@jfriend00 variables are scoped to functions. objects are not. /foo/g constructs a new RegExp object, just as "foo" constructs a new string object. Unless of course there is some "funny caching" going on (perhaps after the 80th such RegExp construction?). In any case, still not an explanation for erratic behavior :-) –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The problem has something to do with the implicit declaration of the regex inside the loop. My guess is that the browser is caching it somewhere or getting confused by that somehow.

If you explicitly create a new regex object each time through the for loop, then Firefox no longer has a problem with this:

var x = "";

for (var i=0; i<10000; i++) {
    var re = new RegExp("foo", "g");
    var matches = re.exec( 'sdkfjfooasdknal' );
    x += matches+"<br>";
}

$('body').html( x );

http://jsfiddle.net/jfriend00/F49db/

And, it doesn't matter which way you explicitly declare the regex as this method works also:

var x = "";

for (var i=0; i<10000; i++) {
    var re = /foo/g;
    var matches = re.exec( 'sdkfjfooasdknal' );
    x += matches+"<br>";
}

$('body').html( x );
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For showing that it may be related to the RegExp literal somehow. I do also suspect it has to do with the VM caching, as might be explained with the 40-good (new), 40-null (reused first 40 with /g?), alternating cycles (reusing in cycle with /g?). –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:30
    
The statement "if you explicitly create" is wrong. As the answer(s) show the work-about is that using an intermediate variable eliminates the issue in FF. In all cases the same number of regex objects should have been created. Presumably without the variable FF aggressively caches the RegExp object a wee bit too much. (e.g. it didn't notice the /g or assumed it would never be used in an immediate-value situation.) –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:59
    
(My argument is that re = /foo/g; re.exec is no more "explicitly creating" than (/foo/g).exec. In both cases there is exactly one RegExp object literal.) –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 1:03
    
@pst - I'm not arguing that there should be a difference between the two cases, but obviously there is. And explicitly creating a new regex object and assigning it to another variable makes it harder for the interpreter to do anything other than what you wanted. Obviously the OP's case has run into some edge cases (probably caching related) and using the intermediate variable pulls the interpreter away from the edge cases to force it to behave properly. –  jfriend00 Apr 16 '12 at 1:24
    
Again, there is no difference in creating the objects. The difference is in the variable assignment (or removing the direct usage in the expression, as noted). –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 1:29

This is only a partial explanation. If you try this fiddle it seems to work fine. So the problem or bug might be in the regex parsing of a literal? I'm not sure, but could it be something where the loop optimization treats the literal differently than the variable.

Here is the fiddle code:

var x = "";

for (var i=0; i<10000; i++) {
    var a='sdkfjfooasdknal';
    var b=/foo/g;
    var matches = b.exec(a);
    x += matches+"<br>";
}

$('body').html( x );​

UPDATE: Here is something I tried to force it out of a normal loop and the problem reappeared. Here is the fiddle http://jsfiddle.net/xXYdF/.

var x = "";
i=200;
function reg(){
    var matches = /foo/g.exec('sdkfjfooasdknal');
    x += matches+"<br>";
}
    function run(){
  setTimeout(function(){
    if(i--){
      reg();
      run();
      $('body').html( x );
    }
  },10);
}

run();
share|improve this answer
    
+1 For half-counter jfriend00 and showing it's not a function of being a RegExp literal. Still likely related to caching and object re-used, would be my guess. –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:32
    
@pst - How is this a counter of my idea? This has an explicit re-declaration of the regex inside the loop just like mine. They used var b = /foo/g rather than new RegExp(), but either way it's an explicit creation of a new object each time through the loop. –  jfriend00 Apr 16 '12 at 0:40
    
FYI, breaking the string out into the separate a variable does not make a difference here. What makes this one work is that the regex is explicitly recreated each time through the loop. –  jfriend00 Apr 16 '12 at 0:44
    
@jfriend00 I kind of guessed that, but I was just trying different things to see what happened. To make it clearer I probably should have undone that. –  qw3n Apr 16 '12 at 0:47
    
@jfriend00 It's a half-counter because it does not use the RegExp constructor but rather still uses the RegExp literal. I agree with the conclusion (that it's a bug), but not the cause (literal vs. explicit constructor invocation). The work-about is thus using a variable and not switching to new RegExp. –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 0:56

It's a bug in the JS engine in Firefox, like jfriend00 says. Should be fixed in Firefox 12. See https://bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=728021

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