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Requirements: Given a file with a list of prefixes, one per line, check a given package name and return true if it matches one of the prefix. This is a subroutine of a project which involves a lot of packages. So efficiency is important. O(logn) or O(1) searching would be great.

I'm new to Perl. I did some search on this question and tried to follow the answer in this thread. The only change I made is to read prefixes from a file. But it won't work.

Here is my code:

use strict;
use List::Util qw/first/;

sub isSkippedPackage {
  my $packageName = shift;
  my $found = first { $packageName =~ /^$_/ } @prefix;
  return (defined($found))
}   

my $file = qw(packageReplicationBlacklist.cfg);
open my $blacklist, '<', $file;
my @prefix = <$blacklist>;
print "prefix has: ", @prefix;
close $blacklist;

my $skipPackages = 1;
my $test = 'PackageA';
if ( $skipPackages && !isSkippedPackage($test) ) {
    print "No prefix for PackageA.\n" 
}
$test = 'PackageB';
if ( $skipPackages && isSkippedPackage($test) ) {
    print "Got a prefix for PackageB.\n" 
}

And in packageReplicationBlacklist.cfg file:

PackageB
PackageC

The current is:

prefix has: PackageB
PackageC
No prefix for PackageA.

It works if I use "my @prefix = qw/PackageB|PackageC/;". So, my guess is the file is read into an array but not a set of strings. How can I change it into a set of strings? Thanks.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I tried running your program, and got the following errors:

Global symbol "@prefix" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 8.
Global symbol "$skipPackages" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 24.
Global symbol "$skipPackages" requires explicit package name at ./test.pl line 28.

However, that didn't surprise me because I knew I was going to get these errors. I'm surprised you didn't get them too.

You need to read up on Perl variable scoping which can be found in the Perlsub tutorial in Perldocs. Perl contains built in documentation via the perldoc command. You can also see the same documentation in the Perldoc webpage. Be careful that you have the correct version of Perl selected.

Basically, there are two types of variables in Perl: Global package variables and lexically scoped local variables.1

Package variables are defined using the our $varable; syntax. Lexically scoped local variables are defined with the my $variable; syntax.

In your case, you declare a my @packages variable inside your if statement. This is a variable that's only available in the if statement itself. Try this:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
# use strict;    #We don't want to use strict!
# use warnings;  #Not that either!

if (1 == 1) { #Always true
   my $foo = "Foo is defined";
   print "1. The value of foo is $foo\n";
}
print "2. The value of foo is $foo\n";

If we run this program we get:

1. The value of foo is Foo is defined
2. The value of foo is 

That's because we lost the definition of $foo as we left the if statement.

An easy way to think of it is that curly braces denote blocks, and if a variable is declared as my inside the block, it is undefined outside the block.

Now, try this:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
# use strict;    #We don't want to use strict!
# use warnings;  #Not that either!

if (1 == 1) { #Always true
   our $foo = "Foo is defined";  #Package Scoped
   print "1. The value of foo is $foo\n";
}
print "2. The value of foo is $foo\n";

Now, we run this program, we get:

1. The value of foo is Foo is defined
2. The value of foo is Foo is defined

That's because when we declare a variable with our, it's defined in the entire package file.2

In fact, if you think of the curly braces as defining blocks, you can think of a my variable declared in a block only being see in that block. You can even do this:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
# use strict;    #We don't want to use strict!
# use warnings;  #Not that either!

{ #Creating a block...
   my $foo = "Foo is defined";
   print "1. The value of foo is $foo\n";
} #End of the block

print "2. The value of foo is $foo\n";

Again, you get:

1. The value of foo is Foo is defined
2. The value of foo is 

That's because the curly braced denoted a block, and once you leave the block, the variable is no longer defined.

Now, try the last program and enable the use strict; and use warnings; statements. You should gets something like this:

Global symbol "$foo" requires explicit package name at ./test2.pl line 10.

That's because use strict; and use warnings; warn you of various types of errors. use strict; requires that you either declare a variable with either an our or my, and will warn you when variables go out of scope. The use warnings; pragma will give you oodles of warnings the most important is that you're using a variable without first giving it a value.

Let's redo that last program again:

#! /usr/bin/env perl
use strict;
use warnings;

my $foo;
{
    $foo = "Foo is defined";
    print "1. The value of foo is $foo\n";
}

print "2. The value of foo is $foo\n";

This time, I declared my $foo; outside of the block, so it's lexically scoped in the entire program. Run this, and we get:

The value of foo is Foo is defined
The value of foo is Foo is defined

I'm sorry about the long winded explanation, but I hope that you understand the scoping of variables in Perl a bit better. If you declared my @packages and my $skipPackages at the beginning of your program, your program compiles. Except that it doesn't do what you want. Instead, you get the errors you had before.

I've rewritten your program a bit using more modern syntax:

  • I'm using both use strict; and use warnings;. That's just good program practice.
  • I've used the use constant to declare a constant for the file name. Syntax is a bit weird because constants don't have sigils like Perl variables have. However, your file name is a constant. You don't want this to change in the middle of your program.
  • I'm using say which is available since Perl 5.10. It's like print, but you don't have to keep using \n at the end of each line.
  • You need to understand the difference between qq(..) which is like creating a word with double quotes and qw(..) which creates a list. You said my $file = qw(packageReplicationBlacklist.cfg); which is syntactically incorrect. It worked in this case because Perl lists return a scalar of all the string values in this particular instance, so you lucked out. What you wanted to do is my $file = qq(packageReplicationBlacklist.cfg);. In fact, you probably really just wanted q(packageReplacationBlacklist.cfg) which are true single quotes. This way, your file doesn't cause problems if it started with an @ or $. Take a look at the Perldoc for Quote like Operators.
  • I've eliminated the List::Util package because it's just more damn work than it's worth. I'll show you a rewritten subroutine that uses it later.
  • Instead of if (defined($blacklist)) { statement to see if the file is opened or not, I am simply taking the return value of my open statement, and using die to kill my program if I can't open the file. You can also use the autodie to automatically kill bad file opens for you if you have Perl 5.10.1 or later.
  • I pass all parameters I use in my subroutine to my subroutine. This way, I don't depend upon a global variable value. My subroutine uses all local variables.
  • Finally, I'm using a foreach loop to loop though all the packages I want to test for. This way, I don't repeat code.

Now your program:

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

use constant {
    FILE_NAME => qq(packageReplicationBlackList.cfg),
};

my @prefix_list;
open my $black_list, "<", FILE_NAME
    or die qq(Couldn't open file ") . FILE_NAME . qq(" for reading: $!\n);

chomp ( @prefix_list = <$black_list> );
close $black_list;

foreach my $package_name  ( qw(PackageA PackageB) ) {
    if ( is_skipped_package( $package_name, @prefix_list ) ) {
        say qq(Package "$package_name" has a prefix);
    }
    else {
        say qq(No prefix found for "$package_name");
    }
}

sub is_skipped_package {
    my $package_name = shift;
    my @list         = @_;

    foreach my $package_to_test (@list) {
        if ( $package_name eq  $package_to_test ) {
            return $package_name;
        }
        else {
            return;
        }
    }
}

This produces:

No prefix found for "PackageA"
Package "PackageB" has a prefix

Which is what you want.

Now, if you really want to use the first function of List::Util, you want to do this:

sub is_skipped_package {
    my $package_name = shift;
    my @list         = @_;

    use List::Util qw(first);

    return first { $_ eq $package_name }   @list;
}

I'm checking for equality and not a regular expression which is what I think you really wanted to do. Notice I am simply returning the value of the first function. If first finds a matching $package_name, it returns the package name, and therefore the results are defined, and my if ( is_skipped_package( $package_name, @prefix_list ) ) { statement will be true. If $package_name isn't found, the first function returns an undefined value, and my if ( is_skipped_package( $package_name, @prefix_list ) ) { statement will fail.

Addendum

One more question: this subroutine is part of a large project (and that's why I didn't use die since we don't want it die if there is no such file).

Fair enough. You could change the whole thing to a if statement: if (open my $file, "<", $file) {. This way, you're checking whether open worked and not whether $file is defined.

If I want to store the prefixes in to a member field (like in Java), say $self->list. How to do it? Is it something like pkg = new packages(skipPackages => 1, list => @prefix_list); and in the new method, shall I use @{$self->list} or $self->@list? Thanks!

That's starting to get a bit complicated...

  • You need to learn about Perl packages and how Perl namespace works.
  • You need to learn about Perl OOP programming and how it works.
  • You need to learn about references. Notice in the subroutine, I pass in the whole array? Bad manners, but I didn't want to go into how to pass a reference to the array since you said you were new to Perl.
  • You need a more secure foundation in Perl itself.

However, you asked, so here's a rough sample. This program would be called Local/Blacklist.pm. You'd use it by saying "use Local::BlackList":

package Local::BlackList;

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

sub new {
    my $class = shift;
    my $self = {};
    bless $self, $class;
    return;
}

sub list {
    my $self =   shift;
    my $member = shift;

    if (not defined $self->{LIST}) {
        $self->{LIST} = [];
    }

    if (defined $member) {
       push @{$self->{LIST}}, $member;
    }

    return @{$self->{LIST}};
}

sub is_member {
   my $self = shift;
   my $item = shift;

   my @list = $self->list;
   foreach my $member (@list) {
      if ($member eq $item) {
          return $item;
      }
   }
   return;
}

I've defined a class called Local::BlackLlist that will contain your list. It's a rather simple class. No way to delete members from the list. This class contains two methods: One adds fields to the list and returns the list. The other sees if a member is a member of the list.

To create a new class object, you'd do this:

  my $blacklist = Local::BlackList->new;

To add a prefix to the list, you'd do this:

  $blacklist->list( $prefix );

To retrieve the list, you'd do this:

  my @prefix_list = $blacklist->list;

To check whether or not something is a member of the list, you'd do this:

 if ( $blacklist->is_member( $member ) )  {
    say qq(Item "$member" is a member of the list);
 }
 else {
    say qq(Item "$member" is not a member of the list);
 }

Note that there are three subroutines. The new is my constructor. Note that there's nothing special about the keyword new. It's sort of a standard that has developed over the years. All my new subroutine did was create a reference to an anonymous hash. The object I create is simply a reference to this hash.

Note in my list subroutine, I check to see if the key to the hash, LIST, exists or not. If it doesn't exist, I create a hash key "LIST" which simply points to an anonymous array. In my list subroutine, I dereference this reference to the array like this @{$self->{LIST}}. I can push stuff on to the array dereferenced this way, and I can return the array itself. I could have returned a reference to the array if I felt that the array could get really, really big and be a memory hog:

sub list {
    my $self =   shift;
    my $member = shift;

    if (not defined $self->{LIST}) {
        $self->{LIST} = [];
    }

    if (defined $member) {
       push @{$self->{LIST}}, $member;
    }

    return $self->{LIST};
}

Now, I'd have to do this:

my $list_ref = $blacklist->list;
my @list = @{$list_ref};

to turn the returned reference back into an array. By the way, I don't like this because it allows people to directly manipulate the array:

   $list_ref = @blacklist->list;

   $value= pop @{$list_ref};

That actually changed my class object! I want to be very careful handing people references back to structure of my class because people might do something without realizing it.

This is just a taste how object oriented Perl is written. Learn the basics, before you start getting too involved with references and more complex data structures.


1. I lied, there are now also state variables that are new to Perl 5.12, and the dreaded local variable which isn't really a local variable, but a global package variable that is part of the cruft that Perl has developed over the last two decades.

In 99% of the cases, if you declare a variable using local $variable, you are probably doing it wrong. You know how Adam and Jamie before every Mythbuster show say "Don't try this at home. We're professionals?" That's the local declaration. Don't use local unless you're a top flight Perl developer and love living in a world where things can blow up in your face.

2. A package is declared with the package statement. Once used, all Perl package variables and functions are in that package. Packages are mainly used in Perl modules to prevent name collisions when defining subroutines and non-lexically scoped variables. See the package function for more information.

In your case, everything is just part of the main package which means it's available in the entire file,

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Thank you, David, for the very detailed explain! I already noticed that I made a mistake by declaring a local variable but using it outside the block. So, I've edited the original post. :D –  arosima Apr 16 '12 at 5:10
    
Oh, I didn't know hitting enter will post the comment... Anyway. One more question: this subroutine is part of a large project (and that's why I didn't use die since we don't want it die if there is no such file). If I want to store the prefixes in to a member field (like in Java), say $self->list. How to do it? Is it something like pkg = new packages(skipPackages => 1, list => @prefix_list); and in the new method, shall I use @{$self->list} or $self->@list? Thanks! –  arosima Apr 16 '12 at 5:24
    
@arosima See the addendum to my answer. It is possible in Perl to do that. In fact, that's what Perl 5 was all about -- object orientedness. However, it's probably more complex than you want to handle for now. –  David W. Apr 16 '12 at 6:15
    
Thanks, @David-w! I still got a little bit confused. I can understand that $blacklist->list( $prefix ); is calling the subroutine list. But when retrieving the list, you use my @prefix_list = $blacklist->list;'. Is the list` here the subroutine or the member field? Suppose I have a subroutine read prefixes from a file and initialize the member field, and then when I use the member field, I hope it would not read the file again and again. –  arosima Apr 16 '12 at 17:48
    
@arosima my @prefix_list = $blacklist->list; is calling the subroutine list. It just happens that list returns the array. Member variables can be package variables (declared with our), or just a method that sets/gets the value. I usually prefer the latter. State variables can also be used in classes. State variables were introduced in Perl 5.10. –  David W. Apr 16 '12 at 18:10

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