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I have a function that accepts large std::vectors (passed by const &) and returns large vectors (by value). In one part of my code, I need to do:

std::list<std::vector<double> > all_vectors;
// all_vectors is filled with values somewhere in here
for (const std::vector & v : all_values)
{
   std::vector<double> res = f(v);
   // do something with res
}

and in another part of my code I need to do:

std::list<std::vector<double> > all_vectors;
// all_vectors is filled with values somewhere in here
for (const std::vector & v : all_values)
{
   std::vector<double> res = f(v);
   // do something different with res
}

The simplest option (memory hog): It would be trivial to reuse code by simply mapping f over all_values and then going through the results and performing // do something with res or // do something different with res (for each case). The downside of this is that I would (needlessly) need to store a long list of large std::vectors. On one hand, I am as certain as I can be that it won't use more memory than I have; but even so, it seems like bad practice to store giant amounts of data unnecessarily.

Option 1 (use iterator to generate results as they are requested): One option would be to create some iterator_map function that behaves like map, but generates the results as they are needed. I think this would be pretty doable with Python's yield.

Option 2 (use object oriented design): Another option would be to use ABC inheritance and override a function g: in one derived class, g would perform // do something with res, and in the other, it would perform // do something different with res.

Option 3+ (???):

I'd really like to hear your advice on how you would handle problems like this in C++. Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
f(v) would filter the vector and return a subset of v ? – Jagannath Apr 16 '12 at 1:58
    
No, f(v) computes a dense Gaussian smooth of the values in v. – user Apr 16 '12 at 14:57
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why do you need to return the vector by value? If you can return by reference and use vector<double>::const_iterator, you can be assured you will not modify the original vector.

If you do need a copy you will most probably need a different copy in both cases, so your option 0 would not work.

If you are compiling a mash-up collection of values from the vectors in the list, the iterator option sounds the best to me -- each time you call operator++, you can dynamically calculate the next element.

share|improve this answer
    
I need to return by value because the result is created from v. But I agree, if it were an iterator I could allocate a single const & return value and then keep returning that. But aside from allocation/deallocation costs, the runtime would be roughly the same (every element in the return value will need to be computed, and only one copy of the return value will exist at a time). – user Apr 16 '12 at 15:05
    
I used the iterator, and it works great. Thanks! – user Apr 19 '12 at 4:18

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