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How do I return the children of a given node (key name) within an object tree with depth =1, means only the first children.

Specific issue:

So here is a sample data object...

{
    "1753": {
        "1755": {
            "1758": {
                "1762": "1753_1755_1758_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1755_1758_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1755_1758_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1755_1758_1761"
            },
            "1759": {
                "1762": "1753_1755_1759_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1755_1759_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1755_1759_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1755_1759_1761"
            }
        },
        "1756": {
            "1758": {
                "1762": "1753_1756_1758_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1756_1758_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1756_1758_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1756_1758_1761"
            },
            "1759": {
                "1762": "1753_1756_1759_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1756_1759_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1756_1759_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1756_1759_1761"
            }
        },
        "1757": {
            "1758": {
                "1762": "1753_1757_1758_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1757_1758_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1757_1758_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1757_1758_1761"
            },
            "1759": {
                "1762": "1753_1757_1759_1762",
                "1760": "1753_1757_1759_1760",
                "1764": "1753_1757_1759_1764",
                "1761": "1753_1757_1759_1761"
            }
        }
    },
    "1754": {
        "1755": {
            "1758": {
                "1763": "1754_1755_1758_1763"
            }
        },
        "1756": {
            "1758": {
                "1763": "1754_1756_1758_1763"
            }
        },
        "1757": {
            "1758": {
                "1763": "1754_1757_1758_1763"
            }
        }
    }
}; 

Each level of the object represents a drop down menu on a page.

What i need to do is when someone selects something from one of the drop down menus I need to return all of the remaining menu's possibilities..

SO for example lets say I select value "1758" from dropdown-3 (because it is the third level in the object), do the following:

I would need to return info stating that because I selected "1758" from dropwdown-3... 
    -dropdown-1 can be 1753, 1754.
    -dropdown-2 can be 1755,1756,1757
    -dropdown-3 can remain unchanged
    -dropdown-4 can be 1762,1760,1764,1761,1763

So far I have been able to achieve that much... the problem comes in when some combination of this happens:

I have selected option "1758" from dropdown-3, AND THEN SELECTED "1754" from dropdown-1...
    -dropdown-1 has the most recent selected value, it can remain unchanged
    -dropdown-2 can be 1755,1756,1757
    -dropdown-3 is set, but can still have its possible values modified & checked for accuracy
        -dropdown-3 can be only 1758
    -dropdown-4 can be only 1753

This is a sample object, all of my objects will have varying depth & complexity... I've made quite a few attempts at this, hopefully someone can show me the light :)

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
code.google.com/p/jsonpath may significantly simplify the task –  kirilloid Apr 16 '12 at 2:43

1 Answer 1

Think about it, you want based on the selection (node name) its children, so you don't need the full object tree (although you could use it), you can easier use a adjacency list as a lookup table (hash table):

adj["1753"] = ["1755"];

adj["1755"] = ["1758"]

adj["1758"] = ["1762", "1760", "1764", "1761"]

adj["1762"] = "1753_1755_1758_1762"    
...

So somebody now selects "1753", you look up adj["1753"] and get the array with the possible chidlren, same with the others.

But if you want to use your current data structure which depth you don't know, then you should use for(var key in tree) + recursion to traverse the tree, but this is pretty much pointless because you need for a given (parent) node name traverse the whole tree to "know" where the parent is located (assuming unique keys!).

So better use adjacency lists.

share|improve this answer
    
To be honest I had no idea what an adjacency list was until you posted this... The concept makes sense but I have no idea how to make one or traverse it. :) –  Jim Apr 16 '12 at 4:29
    
Sorry naturally a php dev not so much a js... I seen now they are much like an associative array, not sure how to create that in js tho. –  Jim Apr 16 '12 at 4:32
    
I mean I can't help you with the thinking part, here is how to use arrays in JS and you already have the link what a adjacency list is with my example, now it's your turn. –  Sam Apr 16 '12 at 21:31
    
What doesn't make sense is that adj["1753"] = ["1755"]; isn't an absolute, adj["1753"] can equal "1755", "1756", or "1757" so how would you determine that? –  Jim Apr 17 '12 at 2:07
    
How would you do that in any other language? You write an object and store the objects in the adjacency list then you know what is what. You obviously have no clue how to handle this issue, you first need to get familiar with the JavaScript foundations. Then come back to this issue. –  Sam Apr 19 '12 at 21:43

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