Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I've been playing around with the Scala HashMap and I've noticed two different representations of the HashMap. I was wondering if somebody could explain the difference of:

Map(123 -> 1)

and

{123=1}

Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
Do you know val m = Map ((123, 1),(456, 2))? –  user unknown Apr 16 '12 at 3:49

2 Answers 2

Where have you seen {123=1}? It's not a standard representation in Scala, but it is the way Java defines toString for its Maps.

val sm = Map(1->1, 2->2) // Map(1 -> 1, 2 -> 2)

val jm = new java.util.HashMap[Int,Int]()
jm.put(1,1)
jm.put(2,2)
jm   
// java.util.HashMap[Int,Int] = {1=1, 2=2}
share|improve this answer
2  
sorry I figured it out. {123=1} occurs when you're using the java.util.HashMap as opposed to the scala one. –  Ken Apr 16 '12 at 3:28
    
@Ken, Ah, yep, that makes sense. –  dhg Apr 16 '12 at 3:29

-> is a method that creates tuples. By itself it doesn't directly have anything to do with maps. So for example 123 -> 1 returns a tuple (123, 1). You can try this in the REPL:

scala> 123 -> 1
res1: (Int, Int) = (123,1)

You can create a map by supplying tuples to object Map's apply method, which is what you are doing when you do this:

val m = Map(123 -> 1, 456 -> 2)

is the same as

val m = Map.apply(123 -> 1, 456 -> 2)

is the same as

val m = Map.apply((123, 1), (456, 2))

which creates a Map with two entries, one with key 123 and value 1, the other one with key 456 and value 2.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.