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Basically I'm trying to make a button be able to handle editing of an element. I want it so that when I click on the Edit button, it changes the text to Save Changes and adds a class which will then bind the button to another click event so that when they click Save Changes, it'll alert Saved and change the text back to Edit. It does this perfectly once. If you continue to try to do it, it simply won't add the class or change the text anymore.

Here is a demo on jsfiddle

The code:

$(function() {
$button = $('button[name="edit"]');
$button.on('click', $button, function() {
    var $that = $(this);
    $that.text('Save Changes');
    $that.addClass('js-editing');
    if ($that.hasClass('js-editing')) {
        $that.off('click').on('click', $that, function() {
            alert('Saved!');
            $that.text('Edit');
            $that.removeClass('js-editing');
        });
    }
});

});​

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Try this http://jsfiddle.net/bpD8B/4/

$(function() {
    $button = $('button[name="edit"]');
    $button.on('click', $button, function() {
        var $that = $(this);
        if($that.text()=='Edit'){
          $that.text('Save Changes');
          $that.addClass('js-editing');
        }
        else{
                alert('Saved!');
                $that.text('Edit');
                $that.removeClass('js-editing');
        }
    });
});
share|improve this answer
    
Man. I should have just done it like this in the beginning. Although I think I'll just use a class instead of checking the value of the text(). Much appreciated. –  bob_cobb Apr 16 '12 at 5:30
1  
@bob_cobb, adding class is not a bad idea, specially when you are trying to change the styles too. –  Starx Apr 16 '12 at 5:31

You never add back the original handler after calling off(), which removes it.

That being said, it might be easier to have two buttons, with appropriate click handlers, and then use hide() and show() to alternate which one is available. To the end user it should look and act exactly the same, and to you it will be a lot less of a headache to code.

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/VgsLA/

I think in the end, this code is more robust and manageable.

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Hmm... interesting take on this. What is the benefit of this over adding a class and just checking if the button has the class or not? –  bob_cobb Apr 16 '12 at 5:37
1  
Because in reality they are two different buttons. They have different labels/text and they have different functions and code. The only thing they have in common is location. So why change the text and functionality on every click? I think this way is a lot less prone to possible bugs. –  Jeff B Apr 16 '12 at 5:47

This is just a logic problem. And with $that.off('click').on('click', $that, function() { you are delegating to itself, which is not how you should do it.

Here is a solution using your code:

$(function() {

    $button = $('button[name="edit"]');
    $button.on('click', $button, function() {
        var $that = $(this);
        if ($that.hasClass('js-editing')) {
            alert('Saved!');
            $that.text('Edit');
            $that.removeClass('js-editing');        
        } else {      
            $that.text('Save Changes'); 
            $that.addClass('js-editing');
        }
    });

});​

Demo

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