Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

The question says it all. Although the hit is not highly significant (I measured it to be between 1.5x to 2x slower), there's no difference between the byte code with try-catch and the byte code without it. So what makes it generally slower?

Pl. note that the question is not about overhead of throwing an exception, but of entering/leaving a try block.

EDIT: here's the code (run on Hotspot 1.6.0_31 server)

static void tryCatch()
{
    int i = 0;
    long l1 = getTime();
    for(int j = 0; j < 100000; j++)
    {
        try
        {
            i++;                
        }
        catch(Exception e)
        {

        }
    }
    long l2 = getTime();
    System.out.println("with try-catch: " + (l2 - l1) + ": " + i);      
}

static void noTryCatch()
{
    int i = 0;
    long l1 = getTime();
    for(int j = 0; j < 100000; j++)
    {
        i++;
    }
    long l2 = getTime();
    System.out.println("w/o  try-catch: " + (l2 - l1) + ": " + i);
}

static long getTime()
{
    return System.nanoTime();       
}

EDIT2: found this nice link for actually performing such tests: http://jsperf.com/try-catch-overhead

share|improve this question
11  
Please show how you measured this. Benchmarking is notoriously difficult to get right. –  Jon Skeet Apr 16 '12 at 6:39
3  
Also: try-catch is not only represented in the bytecode, but in code attributes of the method. In other words: you only see part of the try-catch implementation in the byte code. –  Joachim Sauer Apr 16 '12 at 6:41
    
Here's the question that probably has the answer you seek. Not sure if this can be considered duplicate question: stackoverflow.com/questions/2633834/… –  Max Apr 16 '12 at 6:43
    
2x sounds significant to me. –  Hassan Apr 16 '12 at 6:45
    
@Hassan, agreed; but if try-catch is used sparingly, it won't affect the overall performance significantly. The hit I showed is seen when you execute it in long loops. –  shrini1000 Apr 16 '12 at 6:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Since you have a micro-benchmark its is more likely you are testing how confusing the try/catch block is to the JVM compiler. For example, the JVM can be smart enough to change

for(int j = 0; j < 100000; j++) {
    i++;
}

into

i += 100000 * 1;

using the try/catch block may prevent the more aggresive optimisations, but might not make any difference for a more realistic block of code.


In any case I would normally change something like

for(int j = 0; j < 100000; j++) {
    try {
        // do something
    } catch(Exception e) {
        // break or return
    }
}

.

try {
    for(int j = 0; j < 100000; j++) {
        // do something
    }
} catch(Exception e) {
    // continue or return
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thx (and +1) for a detailed answer. But I want to measure the cost of 'entering' a try block. In the approach you've suggested, I probably won't be able to measure it. –  shrini1000 Apr 16 '12 at 7:26
    
I believe the cost is only that it might prevent a micro-optimisation of the JVM by making the code more complex. e.g. methods are typically only inlined if they are 35 bytes or less. a try/catch block could add a few bytes which could prevent inlining. –  Peter Lawrey Apr 16 '12 at 7:29

My microbenchmark for another question showed there is no significant difference between using/not using a try-catch block, with or without throwing exception in a block or not.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.