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How can I use both conditional and loop statement inside the awk command to convert a file with special value to a different value like "Error", and not doing any subtraction, instead just display the converted new value like "Error" as the output?

  1. if none of the column value (except column 1 which stays the same in the final output) is equal to the special value like "11111", I use an awk command like following:

    awk -F, '{print $1,$2,($3-$2),($4-$2),($5-$2),($6-$2),($7-$2),($8-$2),($9-$2),($10-$2),($11-$2),($12-$2),($13-$2),($14-$1)} ' all.cvs
    
  2. if the column value = the special value, then no need to do "-$2", just display a new value like "Error"

Basically I want: x means column value for column #2 to #14

  • if $2 (column #2) = 11111

    set $2="Error"
    
  • for $3 to $14 (column #3 to #14) if the column value is <> 11111

    $x=$x-$2 
    
  • if the column value =11111

    $x=Error
    
  • At the end, the output will still show 14 columns including original #1 column value and converted/calculated new values for column #2 to #14

I have a file (all.cvs) like following:

  • 14 fields

  • each line may contains a field with a value like "11111" (or any string value)

  • each column separated by ","

  • total number of lines is 90


$cat all.cvs

A,11111,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,10,11,12,13 

B,1,2,3,4,5,6,11111,8,9,10,11,12,13 

C,1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9,11111,11,12,13 
....
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What happens to columns 3-14 if column 2 is error? Copy unchanged? Set to Error? Subtract 11111 from it anyway? –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 16 '12 at 15:49
    
Hi Jonathan, thanks for your questions. if #2 is set to error, and any columns in columns 3-14 has value of 11111, then set it/them to Error too, no subtraction. Subtraction only happens if both column #2 and other column are <> 11111. –  Amos Apr 16 '12 at 18:05

3 Answers 3

awk -F, -v OFS=, -v flag_value=11111 '
  {subtract = $2}
  $2 == flag_value {$2 = "Error"; subtract = 0}
  {
    for (i=3; i<=NF; i++) $i = ($i == flag_value ? "Error" : $i - subtract)
    print
  }
'
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Glenn, thanks for your help. –  Amos Apr 16 '12 at 17:36
    
Having the same problem as the 1st approach provided by beny23. It didn't convert all columns having value of "11111" to "Error". –  Amos Apr 16 '12 at 18:37
    
@Amos, updated. –  glenn jackman Apr 16 '12 at 18:46
    
Hi Glenn, thanks for your update. It works! Pardon my limited knowledge on awk, do you mind explain your script line by line? –  Amos Apr 17 '12 at 4:49

You could use the following approach:

$ awk -F, '
{ 
  printf("%s", $1); 
  s=($2 != 11111 ? $2 : 0); 
  printf(", %s", ($2 != 11111 ? $2 : "Error")); 
  for (i=3; i<=NF; ++i) 
    printf (", %d", ($i != 11111 ? ($i - s) : "Error")); 
  printf("\n"); 
}' all.csv
share|improve this answer
    
Hi Beny23, thanks for your help. –  Amos Apr 16 '12 at 17:36
    
Oooh, hard-coded magic numbers! Gotta love 'em! –  Dennis Williamson Apr 16 '12 at 21:38

Put your conditional blocks before your default block. Put next at the end of each in order to resume processing with the next line.

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