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I filter the input from user in every submission or i have create function which manipulates the get/post values and call it in every submission of form.

But now i kept the below functions in main include file following:

foreach ($_POST as $key => $value) {
    $_POST[$key] = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($value));
}

foreach ($_GET as $key => $value) {
    $_GET[$key] = mysql_real_escape_string(trim($value));
}

It works well, but is there any downsides of doing this for EVERY single post/get? P.S. Well except performance of script.

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Well, it's okay to do if all your post data should go into your database AND if your POST data doesn't containt multidimensional arrays. Try to focus on validating your user input instead of only trying escape the content. –  Repox Apr 16 '12 at 7:04
1  
Why not just use a database provider that uses placeholders? SQL injection "fixed". Extra problems not added. (Not every GET/POST value needs to be "escaped". This is one of the problems with "magic quotes".) –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 7:12
    
When i have more time to practice it i will, for now i need to finish this project. –  redacted Apr 16 '12 at 7:13
    
So then go through your DAL (or whatever muck it is) and make sure each parameter is mysql_real_real_real_real_escaped. –  user166390 Apr 16 '12 at 7:14
    
@Pizda Lohmataja nice nickname ))) –  s.webbandit Apr 16 '12 at 7:36
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3 Answers

  1. Validate user inputs rather than escaping first, after validating and before insertion into db u can escape.
  2. Answer for your question: Doing it in a proper manner is to use function and place those function in a separate file and including that file before calling the function.. your furst way is also fine but if the form and its fields are big in count then the script will be messy and would be hard to maintain by other developers hence using the second way of using a file containing your filtering functions is a good idea in any case....
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This isn't a logical way to solve this. As mentioned, this won't handle multidimensional arrays and will be an annoyance if you all of a sudden might need to work with the original value. For instance someone maybe wants to save a textarea field and wants a couple of rows at the bottom to continue the work later on. These rows will vanish upon saving then.
Form validation may get a bit messy aswell.

Your solution isn't a 100% secure method either. You're still vurnerable against XXS.

Apart from that I know no framework which does this automaticly, and they probably aint doing it for a reason.

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How you even put multidimensional array trough form i don't need that for simple site. –  redacted Apr 16 '12 at 7:15
    
?val[]=1&val[]=2 gives array('val' => array( 0 => 1, 1 => 2)). In posts you basicly have inputs with the name="val[]". –  Robin Castlin Apr 16 '12 at 7:16
    
Thx. i am not pro on XSS, can you give example? –  redacted Apr 16 '12 at 7:17
    
Well basicly a user could write a <script></script> in the <textarea> on your site and make the page where this text is visible to redirect to a virus or similiar stuff. You basicly grant them control of your javascript. This depends on your project though. –  Robin Castlin Apr 16 '12 at 7:23
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mysql_real_escape_string does not fully prevent SQL Injection. Lets see the following example:

$input = mysql_real_escape_string($_POST['id']);
$query = "DELETE FROM user WHERE id={$input};";

Lets say $_POST['id'] equal to 1 OR TRUE

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what does protect 100%? –  redacted Apr 16 '12 at 7:24
    
Good example. This would however be solved by using '' around every extern value. "DELETE FROM user WHERE id='{$input}';" –  Robin Castlin Apr 16 '12 at 7:25
    
The best security is telling your system exactly what you want it to do. Don't let it decide too much on it's own, because then it will gladly process XXS and injections without something telling the system it's wrong to do. –  Robin Castlin Apr 16 '12 at 7:27
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