Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

How to get the transpose of this matrix..Any easier ,algorithmic way to do this...

1st question:

 Input  a=[[1,2,3],[4,5,6],[7,8,9]]
 Expected output a=[[1, 4, 7], [2, 5, 8], [3, 6, 9]] 

2nd Question:

Zip gives me the following output said below,how can i zip when i dont know how many elements are there in the array,in this case i know 3 elements a[0],a[1],a[2] but how can i zip a[n] elements

 >>> zip(a[0],a[1],a[2])
 [(1, 4, 7), (2, 5, 8), (3, 6, 9)]
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 10 down vote accepted

question answers:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> first_answer = np.transpose(a)
>>> second_answer = [list(i) for i in zip(*a)]

thanks to afg for helping out

share|improve this answer
    
What about the solution for 1st question –  Rajeev Apr 16 '12 at 7:06
5  
@Rajeev This is the answer to both questions. zip(*a) is matrix transposition and so is its own inverse. –  agf Apr 16 '12 at 7:06
    
@agf:The first solution output is array of arrays and not tuple.. –  Rajeev Apr 16 '12 at 7:07
4  
@Rajeev So you map(list, zip(*a)) or [list(row) for row in zip(*a)] if you really need the rows to be lists. Often you don't. –  agf Apr 16 '12 at 7:09
1  
Also @luke14free for the second answer I think you mean [list(i) for i in zip(*a)] as zip(*a) already produces tuples. edit: I agree with agf, not sure why you are getting numpy involved here when you don't need to. zip(*a) with a cast to list is a much more elegant(and correct!) solution. –  Nolen Royalty Apr 16 '12 at 7:15

You can use numpy.transpose

numpy.transpose

>>> import numpy
>>> a = [[1, 2, 3], [4, 5, 6], [7, 8, 9]]
>>> numpy.transpose(a)
array([[1, 4, 7],
       [2, 5, 8],
       [3, 6, 9]])
share|improve this answer

Use zip(*a):

>>> zip(*a)
[(1, 4, 7), (2, 5, 8), (3, 6, 9)]

How it works: zip(*a) is equal to zip(a[0], a[1], a[2]).

share|improve this answer
1  
I'd upvote this if you had map(list, zip(*a)) since that would have answered the question without using a non-standard module. –  martineau Feb 17 '14 at 13:09

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.