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I was wondering if you could help me with a coding problem which I can't get my head around. The tab-delimited data I have looks like something like the following:

00001  AU:137  AU:150  AU:180
00001  AU:137  AU:170
00002  AU:180
00003  AU:147  AU:155
00003  AU:155

The output I want is:

00001  AU:137  AU:150  AU:180  AU:170
00002  AU:180
00003  AU:147  AU:155

So the first column (identifier) will merge the values, removing duplicates, so that it becomes a hash. I'm not sure how to work with my current data because it can't be a hash having duplicate keys. I'm also not sure how to push the data into an array if the identifier is the same.

I apologize for not having a code. I did try a few, actually, quite a lot, but they don't look right even to a newbie like myself.

Any help, suggestions would be greatly appreciated and thank you so much for your time and answer. I greatly appreciate it.

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3 Answers 3

up vote -1 down vote accepted

Script:

#!/usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my %hash;
sub uniq { return keys %{{map {$_=>1} @_}}; }

open my $fh, '<input.txt' or die $!;
foreach (<$fh>) {
  $hash{$1} .= $2 if /^(\S+)(\s.*?)[\n\r]*$/;
}
close $fh;

foreach (sort keys %hash) {
  my @elements = uniq split /\t/, $hash{$_};
  print "$_\t", join(' ', sort @elements), "\n";
}

Output:

00001    AU:137 AU:150 AU:170 AU:180
00002    AU:180
00003    AU:147 AU:155
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1  
Hi. Thanks for the script. Unfortunately, it's not giving me the results I would like as in, it's also printing duplicate values for each key. Would there be a way to get rid of the duplicates? Thank you. –  absolutenewbie Apr 17 '12 at 1:05
    
@absolutenewbie - My script works well on my computer, with no duplicates. Are you sure you execute my script above? –  Ωmega Apr 17 '12 at 1:15
1  
Hi. Sorry, I should make this clear. The example output does look the same. I'm just wondering why it's giving me duplicates in a larger set of data I have...Anyway, thank you so much. You got me close enough get rid of duplicate keys. Now I need to find a way to get rid of duplicate values for each key. Thanks again. –  absolutenewbie Apr 17 '12 at 6:22
1  
This doesn't produce the output you say it does, since it won't remove duplicate data as the OP requested. There are two occurrences of AU:137 with a label of 00001 and two of AU:155 with a label of 00003, all of which your program leaves in place. You are also splitting the record on a single whitespace character instead of a tab, which would break the program if there was a space character in any of the first fields, although I admit that is highly unlikely! –  Borodin Apr 17 '12 at 16:47
1  
@stackoverflow: OK the reason your program isn't working is because you are splitting the values on a single space character. The OP's data is tab-separated, which is why both he and I commented that your solution prints duplicate values. This program works only with spaces between the values in the source data. –  Borodin Apr 17 '12 at 18:25

I hope this gives some idea to solve your problem:

use strict;
use warnings;
use Data::Dumper;

my %hash = ();

while (<DATA>) {
    chomp;
    my (@row) = split(/\s+/);
    my $firstkey = shift @row;

    foreach my $secondkey (@row) {
            $hash{$firstkey}{$secondkey}++;
    }
}

print Dumper \%hash;

__DATA__
00001  AU:137  AU:150  AU:180
00001  AU:137  AU:170
00002  AU:180
00003  AU:147  AU:155
00003  AU:15
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3  
my %hash = (); is redundant. Just say my %hash;. That also protects you from writing my %hash = {}; by accident. Also, for tab-delimited data, you should split on /\t/ (or possibly /\t+/ if you want to ignore blank fields). –  cjm Apr 16 '12 at 8:57
1  
my %hash = () reinitializes hash while my %hash just defines scope. I prefer always make variables clear if i don't want data in them being available during multiple calls (closures). About tab i overread, so, yes \t is much cleaner. –  w.k Apr 16 '12 at 12:32
1  
my always creates a new, empty variable that has no connection to previous calls. (our doesn't, because it deals with globals.) –  cjm Apr 16 '12 at 18:31
    
@cjm, my fault, messed up something, but what... –  w.k Apr 16 '12 at 18:43
    
Hi cjm, wk, thank you so much for your help. Unfortunately, the script is not working. I am only getting '$VAR1 = {};' without errors. Would you be able to give me any suggestions? –  absolutenewbie Apr 17 '12 at 1:03

The classical solution to this uses a hash; in fact a hash of hashes, as there are duplicate line numbers as well as duplicate values per line.

This program produces the output you need. It expects the data file to be passed on the command line.

use strict;
use warnings;

my %data;

while (<>) {
  chomp;
  my ($key, @items) = split /\t/;
  $data{$key}{$_}++ for @items;
}

print join("\t", $_, sort keys %{$data{$_}}), "\n" for sort keys %data;

output

00001 AU:137  AU:150  AU:170  AU:180
00002 AU:180
00003 AU:147  AU:155

Or if you prefer a command-line solution

perl -aF/\t/ -lne'$k=shift @F; $d{$k}{$_}++ for @F; END{print join "\t", $_, sort keys %{$d{$_}} for sort keys %d}' myfile

(It may need a little tweaking as I can only test on Windows at present.)

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