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I'm re-asking this question in a simplified and expanded manner.

Consider these sql statements:

create table foo (id INT, score INT);

insert into foo values (106, 4);
insert into foo values (107, 3);
insert into foo values (106, 5);
insert into foo values (107, 5);

select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
having not exists (
    select T2.id, avg(T2.score) avg2
    from foo T2
    group by T2.id
    having avg2 > avg1);

Using sqlite, the select statement returns:

id          avg1      
----------  ----------
106         4.5       
107         4.0       

and mysql returns:

+------+--------+
| id   | avg1   |
+------+--------+
|  106 | 4.5000 |
+------+--------+

As far as I can tell, mysql's results are correct, and sqlite's are incorrect. I tried to cast to real with sqlite as in the following but it returns two records still:

select T1.id, cast(avg(cast(T1.score as real)) as real) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
having not exists (
    select T2.id, cast(avg(cast(T2.score as real)) as real) avg2
    from foo T2
    group by T2.id
    having avg2 > avg1);

Why does sqlite return two records?

Quick update:

I ran the statement against the latest sqlite version (3.7.11) and still get two records.

Another update:

I sent an email to sqlite-users@sqlite.org about the issue.

Myself, I've been playing with VDBE and found something interesting. I split the execution trace of each loop of not exists (one for each avg group).

To have three avg groups, I used the following statements:

create table foo (id VARCHAR(1), score INT);

insert into foo values ('c', 1.5);
insert into foo values ('b', 5.0);
insert into foo values ('a', 4.0);
insert into foo values ('a', 5.0);

PRAGMA vdbe_listing = 1;
PRAGMA vdbe_trace=ON;

select avg(score) avg1
from foo
group by id
having not exists (
    select avg(T2.score) avg2
    from foo T2
    group by T2.id
    having avg2 > avg1);

We clearly see that somehow what should be r:4.5 has become i:5:

enter image description here

I'm now trying to see why that is.

Final edit:

So I've been playing enough with the sqlite source code. I understand the beast much better now, although I'll let the original developer sort it out as he seems to already be doing it:

http://www.sqlite.org/src/info/430bb59d79

Interestingly, to me at least, it seems that the newer versions (some times after the version I'm using) supports inserting multiple records as used in a test case added in the aforementioned commit:

CREATE TABLE t34(x,y);
INSERT INTO t34 VALUES(106,4), (107,3), (106,5), (107,5);  
share|improve this question
    
Just for kicks I ran this to SQL what SQL Server would produce and it complained avg2 and avg1 didn't exist. I replaced them with MAX(T2.score) and MAX(T1.score) and it gave the SQLite result. When I created the table with score REAL it gave the MySQL result. Perhaps your MySQL schema is different to sqlites? –  ta.speot.is Apr 16 '12 at 9:42
    
@ta.speot.is: can you try adding as as in avg(T2.score) as avg2 (two occurences)? –  user610650 Apr 16 '12 at 9:44
    
Doesn't work. Pretty sure SQL Server doesn't play dice when it comes to using aliases in WHERE, GROUP BY or HAVING. –  ta.speot.is Apr 16 '12 at 9:45
    
trying parts of the statement under sqlite I have this SQL error: no such function: exists. Keywords that are working under mysql may not in other databases systems. I would personally use the IN keyword for testing the results of your subquery –  Bathz Apr 16 '12 at 9:45
1  
Seems like sqlite team needs a bug report. –  Mekanik Apr 17 '12 at 12:04

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I tried to mess with some variants of query.

It seems, like sqlite has errors in using of previous declared fields in a nested HAVING expressions.

In your example avg1 under second having is always equal to 5.0

Look:

select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
having not exists (
    SELECT 1 AS col1 GROUP BY col1 HAVING avg1 = 5.0);

This one returns nothing, but execution of the following query returns both records:

...
having not exists (
    SELECT 1 AS col1 GROUP BY col1 HAVING avg1 <> 5.0);

I can not find any similar bug at sqlite tickets list.

share|improve this answer
1  
Yes I'm seeing something very similar with when tracing with VDBE. I already sent sqlite-users@sqlite.org an email about the issue. –  user610650 Apr 17 '12 at 12:49

Have you tried this version? :

select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
having not exists (
    select T2.id, avg(T2.score) avg2
    from foo T2
    group by T2.id
    having avg(T2.score) > avg(T1.score));

Also this one (which should be giving same results):

select T1.*
from
  ( select id, avg(score) avg1
    from foo 
    group by id
  ) T1
where not exists (
    select T2.id, avg(T2.score) avg2
    from foo T2
    group by T2.id
    having avg(T2.score) > avg1);

The query can also be handled with derived tables, instead of subquery in HAVING clause:

select ta.id, ta.avg1
from 
  ( select id, avg(score) avg1
    from foo
    group by id
  ) ta
  JOIN
  ( select avg(score) avg1
    from foo 
    group by id
    order by avg1 DESC
    LIMIT 1
  ) tmp
  ON tmp.avg1 = ta.avg1 
share|improve this answer
    
I just did; same 2 records in sqlite, same 1 record in mysql. –  user610650 Apr 17 '12 at 13:06
    
Yes your second option I have already served as an answer; please see the question I linked at the beginning of this question. –  user610650 Apr 17 '12 at 13:08
    
As to why the original query doesn't work as expected, I suppose it's a bug, related to how subqueries are handled. –  ypercube Apr 17 '12 at 13:16
    
@sixfeetsix: Does the JOIN version shows correct (1-row) result? –  ypercube Apr 17 '12 at 13:53
    
Yes the JOIN version returns the correct results. –  user610650 Apr 17 '12 at 14:16

Lets look at this two ways, i'll use postgres 9.0 as my reference database

(1)

-- select rows from foo 

select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
-- where we don't have any rows from T2
having  not exists (
-- select rows from foo
select T2.id, avg(T2.score) avg2
from foo T2
group by T2.id
-- where the average score for any row is greater than the average for 
-- any row in T1
having avg2 > avg1);

 id  |        avg1        
-----+--------------------
 106 | 4.5000000000000000
(1 row)

then let's move some of the logic inside the subquery, getting rid of the 'not' : (2)

-- select rows from foo 
select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1
from foo T1
group by T1.id
-- where we do have rows from T2
having  exists (
-- select rows from foo
select T2.id, avg(T2.score) avg2
from foo T2
group by T2.id
-- where the average score is less than or equal than the average for any row in T1
having avg2 <= avg1);
-- I think this expression will be true for all rows as we are in effect doing a
--cartesian join 
-- with the 'having' only we don't display the cartesian row set

 id  |        avg1        
-----+--------------------
 106 | 4.5000000000000000
 107 | 4.0000000000000000
(2 rows)

so you have got to ask yourself -- what do you actually mean when you do this correlated subquery inside a having clause, if it evaluates every row against every row from the primary query we are making a cartesian join and I don't think we should be pointing fingers at the SQL engine.

if you want every row that is less than the maximum average What you should be saying is:

select T1.id, avg(T1.score) avg1 
from foo T1 group by T1.id
having avg1 not in 
(select max(avg1) from (select id,avg(score) avg1 from foo group by id)) 
share|improve this answer
    
That select statement in my question is really not that difficult to understand; I simply want the correct result ;-) –  user610650 Apr 18 '12 at 9:57
    
I contend that it is ambiguous and will provide an indeterminate result across different technologies –  Paddy Carroll Apr 18 '12 at 10:21
    
It seems it's not ambiguous to MySql, MS Sql, and now Postgres; and it also seems that the main developer of sqlite is making changes in reaction to the email I sent to sqlite-users@sqlite.org. –  user610650 Apr 18 '12 at 10:25

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