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I need to send a bunch of IP packets that I'm sure will trigger an ICMP TTL-expired error message. How exactly can I associate each error message with the packet that generated it? What field in the ICMP header is used for this?

Should I rather use some custom ID number in the original IP header, so that I can tell which error message corresponds to which packet? If so, which field is most suitable for this?

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1 Answer 1

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The body of ICMP TTL Expired messages must include the IP header of the original packet (which includes the source-port / destination-port) and 64 bits beyond the original header.

Based on timing and that header information, you can derive which packet triggered the TTL-expired message.

I am including a sample triggered by an NTP packet below...

See RFC 792 (Page 5) for more details.


ICMP TTL-Expired Message

Ethernet II, Src: JuniperN_c3:a0:00 (b0:c6:9a:c3:a0:00), Dst: 78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a (78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a)
    Destination: 78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a (78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a)
        Address: 78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a (78:2b:cb:37:4c:7a)
        .... ...0 .... .... .... .... = IG bit: Individual address (unicast)
        .... ..0. .... .... .... .... = LG bit: Globally unique address (factory default)
    Source: JuniperN_c3:a0:00 (b0:c6:9a:c3:a0:00)
        Address: JuniperN_c3:a0:00 (b0:c6:9a:c3:a0:00)
        .... ...0 .... .... .... .... = IG bit: Individual address (unicast)
        .... ..0. .... .... .... .... = LG bit: Globally unique address (factory default)
    Type: IP (0x0800)
Internet Protocol, Src: 172.25.116.254 (172.25.116.254), Dst: 172.25.116.10 (172.25.116.10)
    Version: 4
    Header length: 20 bytes
    Differentiated Services Field: 0x00 (DSCP 0x00: Default; ECN: 0x00)
        0000 00.. = Differentiated Services Codepoint: Default (0x00)
        .... ..0. = ECN-Capable Transport (ECT): 0
        .... ...0 = ECN-CE: 0
    Total Length: 56
    Identification: 0x86d7 (34519)
    Flags: 0x02 (Don't Fragment)
        0.. = Reserved bit: Not Set
        .1. = Don't fragment: Set
        ..0 = More fragments: Not Set
    Fragment offset: 0
    Time to live: 255
    Protocol: ICMP (0x01)
    Header checksum: 0xb3b1 [correct]
        [Good: True]
        [Bad : False]
    Source: 172.25.116.254 (172.25.116.254)
    Destination: 172.25.116.10 (172.25.116.10)
Internet Control Message Protocol
    Type: 11 (Time-to-live exceeded)
    Code: 0 (Time to live exceeded in transit)
    Checksum: 0x4613 [correct]
    Internet Protocol, Src: 172.25.116.10 (172.25.116.10), Dst: 172.25.0.11 (172.25.0.11)
        Version: 4
        Header length: 20 bytes
        Differentiated Services Field: 0x00 (DSCP 0x00: Default; ECN: 0x00)
            0000 00.. = Differentiated Services Codepoint: Default (0x00)
            .... ..0. = ECN-Capable Transport (ECT): 0
            .... ...0 = ECN-CE: 0
        Total Length: 36
        Identification: 0x0001 (1)
        Flags: 0x00
            0.. = Reserved bit: Not Set
            .0. = Don't fragment: Not Set
            ..0 = More fragments: Not Set
        Fragment offset: 0
        Time to live: 0
            [Expert Info (Note/Sequence): "Time To Live" only 0]
                [Message: "Time To Live" only 0]
                [Severity level: Note]
                [Group: Sequence]
        Protocol: UDP (0x11)
        Header checksum: 0xee80 [correct]
            [Good: True]
            [Bad : False]
        Source: 172.25.116.10 (172.25.116.10)
        Destination: 172.25.0.11 (172.25.0.11)
    User Datagram Protocol, Src Port: telindus (1728), Dst Port: ntp (123)
        Source port: telindus (1728)
        Destination port: ntp (123)
        Length: 16
        Checksum: 0xa7a1 [unchecked, not all data available]
            [Good Checksum: False]
            [Bad Checksum: False]
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Ok, so I should keep track of each header and first 8 bytes of payload for each packet, right? It's not too fast when it comes to a search, but if there's no other way, then I'll deal with it. –  Ricky Robinson Apr 17 '12 at 15:56

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