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I know Javascript doesn't have classes in the same way that traditional OOP languages do and that a "class" definition such as the following, is merely a function object that can be used with the new keyword:

function MyClass(){
  this.a = function(){ /* Do something */ }; // Public function
  function b(){ /* Do something */ }; // Private function
}

What I'm wondering is, if I define a global object (to avoid polluting the namespace) and define my classes inside this object, can I define a static method for my class in a nicer way than this:

var MyObject = {
  MyClass: function(){
    this.a = function(){ /* Do something */ }; // Public function
    function b(){ /* Do something */ }; // Private function
  },
}
MyObject.MyClass.MyStaticMethod = function(){ /* Do something */ };

I was thinking something along the lines of defining MyStaticMethod inside the MyClass function scope - is this possible?

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1 Answer

You can do this:

var MyObject = {
    MyClass: function(){
        this.a = function(){ /* Do instance-y stuff */ };
        MyClass.MyStaticMethod = function(){ /* Do static-y stuff */ };
    }
}

but I think it's a bad idea. In general, I think it's better practice (because it's more readable) to define both static and instance methods OUTSIDE of the constructor. As in:

function MyClass() { /* Do initialization stuff */ }
MyClass.prototype.a = function() { /* Do instance-y stuff */ }
MyClass.MyStaticMethod = function() { /* Do static-y stuff */ }
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