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I'd like to be able to call an annotation with as many parameter as I want, something like this :

@Authorize("Admin", "Moderator", "User")
public static void read() {
    // ...
}

So far, here's my annotation :

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target({ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.TYPE})
public @interface Authorize {
    String[] value() default {};
}

But as you may know, this only works with :

@Authorize
@Authorize("Admin")
@Authorize({"Admin", "Moderator", "User"})

In fact, the first two are fine to me, it's the last one that bothers me.

The reason is simple.

For rights, I want a method to be available for many profile, and {} means "WITH", I'm looking for a "OR" ;)

(In my point of view) {} means "WITH" because it cames "as a package". Items linked together. For example, if you take this :

SomeQuery.select({"A", "B", "C"}, {"D", "E", "F"}, {"G", "H", "I"})

I would translate it as :

SELECT WHERE (A, B, C) OR (D, E, F) OR (G, H, I);

(This is not some SQL query, just an example of how I see the {} and With/Or)

Thanks!

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3  
{} means "WITH", can you elaborate on this? –  biziclop Apr 16 '12 at 10:11
3  
This would be implementation dependent, it is a collection, the "With" or "Or" is entirely up to the developer! –  TacB0sS Apr 16 '12 at 10:12
    
In your update example you emphasis the implementation specific I've mentioned. –  TacB0sS Apr 16 '12 at 11:26
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Really, its the documentation that defines the meaning of your annotation, the JDK simply does not know or care. If you are looking for anyone else's two coppers, on my first read of your question I assumed the list was an OR, not an AND. In any case, if you want total unambiguity, declare your annotation in such a way as to be self-documenting:

@Retention(RetentionPolicy.RUNTIME)
@Target({ElementType.METHOD, ElementType.TYPE})
public @interface Authorize {
    /**
     * Roles to authorize. By default, any of the roles specified
     * will be accepted as authorization
     */
    String[] value() default {};

    /**
     * Roles to authorize. Any matched role in the list will be accepted
     * as authorization.
     */
    String[] anyOf() default {};

    /**
     * Roles to authorize. All roles in the list must match to be accepted
     * as authorization.
     */
    String[] allOf() default {};
}
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This is very interesting! Thanks! –  Cyril N. Apr 16 '12 at 11:50
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you can't do it as far as I know.

One way to get the equivalent is to use for example

@Authorize({"A,B,C", "D,E,F", "G,H,I"})

and in the underlying implementation if you need to have the individual components:

String[] component = x.value[idx].split(",");

Here the separator is a comma, but can be anything depending on your requirements/limitations.

Regards.

share|improve this answer
    
It's a nice idea, but it becomes more complicated if, instead of String, I want something else (like Enums). It still possible though, but I'd like a simplier way to do it (than parsing each string, trying to see if they exists in the enum, etc). –  Cyril N. Apr 16 '12 at 11:48
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You could do the following

public @interface Authorize {
    String[] value();
}

public @interface Packages {
    Authorize[] value();
}

So you could have

@Packages({
   @Authorize({"A", "B", "C"}),
   @Authorize({"D", "E", "F"}),
   @Authorize({"G", "H", "I"})
})
public void myMethod()

or

@Authorize({"A", "B", "C"})
public void myMethod2()

(where the second form is just a shorthand for:)

@Packages({
   @Authorize({"A", "B", "C"})
})
public void myMethod2()
share|improve this answer
    
I like the idea of splitting the rights in sub classes, and with this, you emphasis the fact that {} does not necessarily means "WITH". But I find this technic to be more heavy in term of code. –  Cyril N. Apr 16 '12 at 11:48
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