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My problem is that I have too many files in single directory. I cannot "ls" the directory, cos is too large. I need to move all files in better directory structure.

I'm using the last 3 digits from ID as folders in reverse way.

For example ID 2018972 will gotta go in /2/7/9/img_2018972.jpg.

I've created the directories, but now I need help with bash script. I know the IDs, there are in range 1,300,000 - 2,000,000. But I can't handle regular expressions.

I wan't to move all files like this:

/images/folder/img_2018972.jpg -> /images/2/7/9/img_2018972.jpg

I will appreciate any help on this subject. Thanks!

share|improve this question
    
you can emulate ls using something like; for f in *; do printf -- "%s\t" "$f"; done and ls -1 with for f in *; do printf -- "%s\n" "$f"; done . ls fails here because of ARG_MAX, maximum arguments limit. –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 16 '12 at 10:47
    
Thanks for replays, I forgot to mention, that in the folder I have more jpg files with the same file name structure, but with "_220, _380" at the end.. like: img_1234567_220.jpg. –  Alex Apr 16 '12 at 11:00
    
do you mean that you don't want to match those ? or is the answer ok ? –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 16 '12 at 11:03
    
I want to match them too, just I'm not sure if the answers are OK.I can make several bash scripts for any image size that I have, because they are not just two.. in fact they are (_80,_125,_220,_340,_380,_620). I would use your solution, but can you tell me is it safe? :) –  Alex Apr 16 '12 at 11:08
    
with @kev 's answer any filename ending in three digits followed by .jpg will be matched. with my answer any filename ending with .jpg will be matched, and the three last letters will be extracted. kev's will not match _80, and wont move those files (as '_' is not a digit/in range 0-9), while mine will match it, and move it in /images/0/8/_/. I can alter that behavior if not desired. –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 16 '12 at 11:13
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

EDIT: after explainations in comments the following assumptions exists:

  • filenames are in the form of img_<id>.jpg or img_<id>_<size>.jpg
  • the new dir is the reverse order of the three last digits of the id

using Bash:

for file in /images/folder/*.jpg; do 
    fname="${file%.*}"      # remove extension and _<size>
    [[ "$fname" =~ img_[0-9]+_[0-9]+$ ]] && fname="${fname%_*}"

    last0="${fname: -1:1}"  # last letter/digit
    last1="${fname: -2:1}"  # last but one letter/digit
    last2="${fname: -3:1}"  # last but two letter/digit

    newdir="/images/$last0/$last1/$last2"
    # optionally check if the new dir exists, if not create it
    [[ -d "$newdir" ]] || mkdir -p "$newdir"

    mv "$file" "$newdir"
done

if * can't handle it (although I think * in a for loop has no limits),
use find as suggested by @Michał Kosmulski in the comments

while read -r; do 
    fname="${REPLY%.*}"     # remove extension and _<size>
    [[ "$fname" =~ img_[0-9]+_[0-9]+$ ]] && fname="${fname%_*}"

    last0="${fname: -1:1}"  # last letter/digit
    last1="${fname: -2:1}"  # last but one letter/digit
    last2="${fname: -3:1}"  # last but two letter/digit

    newdir="/images/$last0/$last1/$last2"
    # optionally check if the new dir exists, if not create it
    [[ -d "$newdir" ]] || mkdir -p "$newdir"

    mv "$REPLY" "$newdir"
done < <(find /images/folder/ -maxdepth 1 -type f -name "*.jpg")
share|improve this answer
    
The shell expansion of /images/folder/*.jpg will probably not work due to the huge number of files, but you can replace the for-loop with find /images/folder -maxdepth 1 -type f -name '*.jpg' | while read; do <do stuff based on $REPLY>; done –  Michał Kosmulski Apr 16 '12 at 10:34
    
added that option, although I think * has no limit when used in a loop. there are limits when used as argument to a function/script; ARG_MAX that is. –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 16 '12 at 10:42
    
Thanks for great help. I have used second version of script (where we use find as suggested by @Michał Kosmulski in the comments). It works great, even in folder they are so many files, that I can't even count... I suppose over 2 - 3 million files. Let's see when it completes. Thanks to all for your help! –  Alex Apr 16 '12 at 12:25
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find /images/folder -type f -maxdepth 1 | while read file
do
filelen=${#file}
((rootn=$filelen-5))
((midn=$filelen-6))
((topn=$filelen-7))
root=${file:$rootn:1}
mid=${file:$midn:1}
top=${file:$topn:1}
mkdir -p /images/${root}/${mid}/${top}
mv $file /images/${root}/${mid}/${top}
done
share|improve this answer
    
I think this is too much work calculating offsets. also in UNIX and UNIX like OSes, filenames are allowed to contain anything. You better add some quotes there, and look up the -r switch to read. Try help read in your shell ;) –  c00kiemon5ter Apr 16 '12 at 10:52
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