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We have lots of code that has “min” and “max” values for things like prices, profit, costs etc. At present these are passed as two parameters to methods and often have different properties/methods to retrieve them.

I have seen a 101 custom classes to store ranges of values in different code bases over the past few decades, before I create yet another such class, I wish to confirm that the .NET framework these days don’t have such a class built in somewhere.

(I know how to create my own class if needed, but we have too many wheels in this world already for me to just invent anther one on a whim)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That's correct, there is no built-in class in C# or the BCL for ranges. However, there is TimeSpan in the BCL for representing time spans, which you can compose additionally with a DateTime to represent a range of times.

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Why was this downvoted? –  Jason Apr 18 '12 at 11:35
    
The downvotes on this are confusing me. –  Jason Apr 29 '12 at 2:36
    
I got two unexplained downvotes as well. Quite annoying. +1 from me to compensate. –  Steven Feb 11 '13 at 10:36
    
I guess because .Net actually has one, it's Enumerable class in the System.Core dll, so it's built-in and has a few Range APIs. –  Arman McHitaryan Jan 16 at 10:46
    
@Arman McHitaryan: No, that's not the same thing at all. –  Jason Jan 23 at 3:13

AFAIK there is no such thing in .NET. Would be interesting though, to come up with a generic implementation.

Building a generic BCL quality range type is a lot of work, but it might look something like this:

public enum RangeBoundaryType
{
    Inclusive = 0,
    Exclusive
}

public struct Range<T> : IComparable<Range<T>>, IEquatable<Range<T>>
    where T : struct, IComparable<T>
{
    public Range(T min, T max) : 
        this(min, RangeBoundaryType.Inclusive, 
            max, RangeBoundaryType.Inclusive)
    {
    }

    public Range(T min, RangeBoundaryType minBoundary,
        T max, RangeBoundaryType maxBoundary)
    {
        this.Min = min;
        this.Max = max;
        this.MinBoundary = minBoundary;
        this.MaxBoundary = maxBoundary;
    }

    public T Min { get; private set; }
    public T Max { get; private set; }
    public RangeBoundaryType MinBoundary { get; private set; }
    public RangeBoundaryType MaxBoundary { get; private set; }

    public bool Contains(Range<T> other)
    {
        // TODO
    }

    public bool OverlapsWith(Range<T> other)
    {
        // TODO
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return string.Format("Min: {0} {1}, Max: {2} {3}",
            this.Min, this.MinBoundary, this.Max, this.MaxBoundary);
    }

    public override int GetHashCode()
    {
        return this.Min.GetHashCode() << 256 ^ this.Max.GetHashCode();
    }

    public bool Equals(Range<T> other)
    {
        return
            this.Min.CompareTo(other.Min) == 0 &&
            this.Max.CompareTo(other.Max) == 0 &&
            this.MinBoundary == other.MinBoundary &&
            this.MaxBoundary == other.MaxBoundary;
    }

    public static bool operator ==(Range<T> left, Range<T> right)
    {
        return left.Equals(right);
    }

    public static bool operator !=(Range<T> left, Range<T> right)
    {
        return !left.Equals(right);
    }

    public int CompareTo(Range<T> other)
    {
        if (this.Min.CompareTo(other.Min) != 0)
        {
            return this.Min.CompareTo(other.Min);
        }

        if (this.Max.CompareTo(other.Max) != 0)
        {
            this.Max.CompareTo(other.Max);
        }

        if (this.MinBoundary != other.MinBoundary)
        {
            return this.MinBoundary.CompareTo(other.Min);
        }

        if (this.MaxBoundary != other.MaxBoundary)
        {
            return this.MaxBoundary.CompareTo(other.MaxBoundary);
        }

        return 0;
    }
}
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Can the downvoters please explain their downvote? –  Steven Apr 18 '12 at 18:12
    
Well I haven't downvoted you but the thing I don't like in here, is enforcing T to be struct? Why such a constraint? Another thing is that the range itself shouldn;t be struct. Struct is good when it occupies less memory than a pointer (then it's efficient - copying). This class obviously takes more than 4 or 8 bytes. –  dzendras May 12 '12 at 0:49
    
@dzendras: I do agree with your comments. The idea was to give the type value type semantics, so i picked struct, but this doesn't have to be. Note that the framework design guidelines advice value types to be smaller than 16 bytes, so not 8 or 4, but the range can easily become 16 bytes or bigger, for instance when using a Range<DateTime>. –  Steven May 12 '12 at 1:40

I've started to make my own.

public class Range<T> where T : IComparable
{
    private readonly T start;

    private readonly T end;

    public Range(T start, T end)
    {
        if (start.CompareTo(end) < 0)
        {
            this.start = start;
            this.end = end;
        }
        else
        {
            this.start = end;
            this.end = start;
        }
    }

    public T Start
    {
        get
        {
            return this.start;
        }
    }

    public T End
    {
        get
        {
            return this.end;
        }
    }

    public static bool Intersect(Range<T> a, Range<T> b)
    {
        return !(b.Start.CompareTo(a.End) > 0 || a.Start.CompareTo(b.End) > 0);
    }

    public bool Intersect(Range<T> other)
    {
        return Intersect(this, other);
    }
}
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Cmon, guys, .Net Framework has one actually, it's the System.Linq.Enumerable class from the System.Core.dll. It has a Range(int start, int count) API as well as a few others you can make use of. This is especially useful for I-love-to-linq guys, as me ;) So enjoy it.

System.Linq.Enumerable for more details.

if you couple it with the System.Random guy you get a random length sequence of any Type. It's cool to have one for unit testing, you know. So it rolls ;)

        var events = from n in Enumerable.Range(0, new Random().Next(10))
        select new T();
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The question is about a data type to store a range. (e.g. The shooting distance of water gun X is 10-20ft. It would be logical to have a single property "Range<int> shootingDistance" instead of "int shootingDistanceMin and int shootingDistanceMax.) Enumerable.Range is great for some things, but it's a static method that can't be instantiated. –  MysteriousWhisper Apr 25 at 20:05
    
@MysteriousWhisper, you're right. But it's a good tool to create that Range<T>. –  Arman McHitaryan Apr 29 at 8:35

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