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I'm trying to build my first non-trivial regular expression (for use in Python), but struggling.

Let us assume that a word in language X (NOT English) is a sequence of minimal 'structures'. Each 'structure' could be:

An independent vowel (basically one letter of the alphabet)
A consonant (one letter of the alphabet)
A consonant followed by a right-attaching vowel
A left-attaching vowel followed by a consonant
(Certain left-attaching vowels) followed by a consonant followed by (certain right-attaching vowels)

For example this word of 3 characters:

<a consonant><a left-attaching vowel><an independent vowel>

is not a valid word, and should not match the regex, because there is no consonant to the right of the left-attaching vowel.

I know all the Unicode ranges - the Unicode ranges for consonants, independent vowels, left-attaching vowels and so on.

Here is what I have so far:

WordPattern = (
ur'('
ur'[\u0985-\u0994]|'
ur'[\u0995-\u09B9]|'
ur'[\u0995-\u09B9(\u09BE|[\u09C0-\u09C4])]|'
ur'[(\u09BF|\u09C7|\u09C8)\u0995-\u09B9]|'
ur'[(\u09BF|\u09C7|\u09C8)\u0995-\u09B9(\u09BE|[\u09C0-\u09C4])]'
ur')+'
)

It's not working. Apart from getting it to work, I have three specific problems:

  • I need to split the regular expression over multiple lines, or else the code is going to look terrible. How do I do this?
  • I would like to use string substitution / templates of some sort to 'name' the Unicode ranges, for code readability and to prevent typing Unicode ranges multiple times.
  • (This seems very difficult) The list of permissible minimal 'structures' will have to be extended later. Is there any way to set up a sort of 'loop' mechanism within a regex, so that it works for all permissible structures in a list?

Any help would be appreciated. This seems very complex to a beginner!

share|improve this question
    
'Non trivial regular expressions' sounds like a bad idea to begin with. Regexes are a great concise syntax for simple patterns, but if you're trying to parse anything more complex, they get horribly unreadable. You could look at dedicated parsing tools. – Thomas K Apr 16 '12 at 12:27
    
What kind of parsing tools do you think I could use here? – Velvet Ghost Apr 16 '12 at 12:30
    
I'm not an expert, but two libraries I've heard of are pyparsing and ply. – Thomas K Apr 16 '12 at 12:42
    
@ThomasK: regular expressions are a perfect match for this kind of patterns. The main problem is the RE syntax in common programming languages; the computational linguistics community has developed a variety of specialized RE toolkits to circumvent this. – larsmans Apr 16 '12 at 12:42
    
One reason your regexp is "not working" is that character ranges [...] can only contain characters (possibly as classes or ranges). They cannot contain a parenthesized group, operators like *, + or |, or another character range. – alexis Apr 16 '12 at 16:11

The appropriate tool for morphological analysis of languages with non-trivial morphology is "finite state transducers". There are robust implementations that you can track down and use (one by Xerox Parc). There's one that has python bindings (for using as an external library). Google it.

FSTs are based on finite-state automata, like (pure) regular expressions, but they are by no means a drop-in replacement. It's complex machinery, so if your goals are simple (e.g., syllabification for purposes of hyphenation) you may want to look for something simpler. There are machine-learning algorithms that will "learn" hyphenation, for example. If you are indeed interested in morphological analysis, you have to make the effort to look at FSTs.

Now for your algorithm, in case you really only need a trivial implementation: Since any vowel or consonant could be independent, your rules are ambiguous: They allow "ab" to be parsed as "a-b". Such ambiguities mean that a regexp approach will probably never work, but you may get better results if you put the longer regexps first, so they are used in preference to the short ones when both would apply. But really you need to build a parser (by hand or using a module) and try different things in steps. It's backwards from what you imagined: Set up a loop that uses different regexps, and "consumes" the string in steps.

However, it seems to me that what you are describing is essentially syllabification. And the near-universal rule of syllabification is this: A syllable consists of a core vowel, plus as many preceding ("onset") consonants as the rules of the language allow, plus any following consonants that cannot belong to the next syllable. The rule is called "maximize onset", and it has the consequence that it's easier to parse your syllables backwards (from the end of the word). Try it out.

PS. You probably know this, but if you put the following as the second line in your scripts you can embed Bengali in your regexps:

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the reply. "Since any vowel or consonant could be independent" - this is not true for Bangla. Some vowels cannot be independent. Yes, I'm looking at simple syllabification at the moment, but only as a first step towards morphological analysis. So I think I'll invest some time and read up on FSTs. Thanks for the tips too, I'll try them out and post a full solution here if I find one. And yes, I did know about the # -- coding: utf-8 --. – Velvet Ghost Apr 17 '12 at 5:40
    
I was able to find a host of literature and software on using FSTs for morphological analysis, thanks for the pointer. – Velvet Ghost Apr 17 '12 at 6:05
  • I need to split the regular expression over multiple lines, or else the code is going to look terrible. How do I do this?

Use the re.VERBOSE flag when compiling the regex.

pattern = re.compile(r"""(
                            [\u0985-\u0994]  # comment to explain what this is
                          | [\u0995-\u09B9]
                          # etc.
                         )
                      """, re.VERBOSE)
  • I would like to use string substitution / templates of some sort to 'name' the Unicode ranges

You can construct an RE from ordinary Python strings:

>>> subpatterns = {"vowel": "[aeiou]", "consonant": "[^aeiou]"}
>>> "{consonant}{vowel}+{consonant}*".format(**subpatterns)
'[^aeiou][aeiou]+[^aeiou]*'
  • The list of permissible minimal 'structures' will have to be extended later. Is there any way to set up a sort of 'loop' mechanism within a regex, so that it works for all permissible structures in a list?

I'm not sure if I get what you mean, but... suppose you have a list of (uncompiled) REs, say, patterns, then you can compute their union with

re.compile("(%s)" % "|".join(patterns))

Be careful with special characters when constructing REs this way and use re.escape where necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, it's not a matter of just addressing the 3 points above. Those are improvements I need to make AFTER I get the regex working. It's not working at the moment. However, thanks for the first and second solutions above. About the third one: what I meant is - my list of 5 minimal structures at the beginning of my original post may have to be extended. For example, let's say I need to allow consonants followed by a NEW Unicode range called right-accents. I don't think simply constructing the union of regexes (regexii? :P) would address this sort of extension? – Velvet Ghost Apr 16 '12 at 12:50
    
If you use the new str.format() instead of the old-fashioned C-style formatting, the string will be easier to work with. "{consonant}{vowel}+{consonant}*".format(subpatterns) is easier to follow without all those extra '%' chars. – Paul McGuire Apr 16 '12 at 13:13
    
@PaulMcGuire: good point, fixed. – larsmans Apr 16 '12 at 13:38
    
@Atriya: that still sounds like a union to me... (and the Latin plural of regex would be regices, I think ;) – larsmans Apr 16 '12 at 13:39
    
Okay, thanks! I'll try and put your techniques into action! – Velvet Ghost Apr 17 '12 at 5:42

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