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I am not sure if I understood the usage of delegates correctly but I would like to read delegate return value in publisher class. The example is below with description.

//Publisher class
    public class ValidateAbuse
    {

    public delegate List<String> GetAbuseList();
    public static GetAbuseList Callback;

    public void Ip(string ip)
    {
    //   I would like to read GetAbuseList value (List<String>) here. How to do that?
    }

    }


//Subscriber class
    class Server
    {

        public static void Start()
        {
            ValidateAbuse.Callback = GetIpAbuseList;
            ValidateAbuse.Ip(MyIp);
        }

        private static List<string> GetIpAbuseList()
        {
            //return List<String> to ValidateAbuse class and use return value in public void Ip(string ip) method 
        }
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I suggest you don't use static but instead pass the callback as a parameter when creating the ValidateAbuse instance. Also, you can use the built-in delegate Func<List<string> instead of creating your own. –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 16 '12 at 12:29
    
@TorbjörnKalin Could you please post a example? I am new to c# and example would be more clearly for me. –  Tomas Apr 16 '12 at 12:32
    
You're invoking ValidateAbuse.Ip statically (without an instance), however the Ip method is not actually defined static. –  M.Babcock Apr 16 '12 at 12:35
    
@Tomas too much to write in a comment, so I posted an answer. –  Torbjörn Kalin Apr 16 '12 at 14:33
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3 Answers 3

public void Ip(string ip)
{
  if (Callback != null)
  {
    List<String> valueReturnedByCallback = Callback();
  }
}
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It should be as simple as:

// Ip in your code sample is missing static
public static void Ip(string ip)
{
    List<string> abuseList;
    if (Callback != null)
        abuseList = Callback()
}

However you can avoid creating a delegate all together by using a Func:

public static Func<List<string>> Callback;
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Here's a version that does not use static for ValidateAbuse and that uses the built-in Func<T> delegate.

public class ValidateAbuse
{
    private Func<List<string>> callback;

    public ValidateAbuse(Func<List<string>> callback)
    {
        this.callback = callback;
    }

    public void Ip(string ip)
    {
        var result = callback();
    }
}

public class Server
{
    public static void Start()
    {
        var validateAbuse = new ValidateAbuse(GetIpAbuseList);
        validateAbuse.Ip(MyIp);
    }

    private static List<string> GetIpAbuseList()
    {
        //return List<string> to ValidateAbuse class and use return value in public void Ip(string ip) method 
    }
}

I recommend you avoid static since that gives you a global state, which could later give you coupling problems and also makes it hard for you to unit test.

The other answers given so far has a guard clause, checking Callback for null. Unless that is expected behaviour (that Callback is null) I would avoid this. It's better to crash early than to get hard to debug errors later on.

I would also try to make the Server non-static.

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