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Which one of these would be the best way to do this when you have very long IfElse?

        if (text.contains("text"))
        {
            // do the thing
        }
        else if (text.contains("foo"))
        {
            // do the thing
        }
        else if (text.contains("bar"))
        {
            // do the thing
        }else ...

Or

        if (text.contains("text") || text.contains("foo") || ...)
        {
            // do the thing
        }

Or maybe

        Pattern pattern = Pattern.compile("(text)|(foo)|(bar)|...");
        Matcher matcher = pattern.matcher(text);
        if(matcher.find())
        {
            // do the thing
        }

And I mean ONLY when you have to check a lot of these. Thanks!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Usually long If else statements are replaced with case statements, but this is not always possible. If I where to recommend, I would go for the second option, option 1 will give you a bunch of If else if else statements which do the same thing while for the third case, regular expressions tend to grow pretty large pretty fast.

Again depending on how much alot is, it could eventually be better to just throw all your strings in a data structure and iterate over it to see if the element is in it.

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I would personally use a set as I think it is easier to read and the contains will be efficient in O(1):

Set<String> keywords = new HashSet<String>();
keywords.add("text");
keywords.add("foo");
keywords.add("bar");

if(keywords.contains(text)) {
    //do your thing
}

And if you like it compact, you can also write:

Set<String> keywords = new HashSet<String>(Arrays.asList("text", "foo", "bar"));

if(keywords.contains(text)) {
    //do your thing
}

And finally, if you always use the same list, you can make keywords private static final instead of recreating it each time you run the method.

EDIT
Following a comment, it is true that what is above is equivalent to using a condition with text.equals("xxx"), not text.contains("xxx"). If you really meant to use contains, then you would have to iterate over the set and test each string, but it becomes an O(n) operation:

for (String key : keywords) {
    if (text.contains(key)) {
        //do your stuff
        break;
    }
}
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I think it's actually O(log n) because a set is stored internally as a binary tree. A HashTable has amortised efficiency of O(1) though. –  Mike T Apr 16 '12 at 13:01
1  
From the javadoc: "This class offers constant time performance for the basic operations (add, remove, contains and size), assuming the hash function disperses the elements properly among the buckets" - That should be the case with Strings. –  assylias Apr 16 '12 at 13:02
    
My bad. I was confusing them with C++ sets, which "are typically implemented as binary search trees". –  Mike T Apr 16 '12 at 13:06
    
But wouldn't this be the opposite of what he wants? if text is "foo1" text.contains("foo") would return true, but keywords.contains(text) would be false, because keywords only hold "foo"? –  Jave Apr 16 '12 at 13:14
    
@Jave You are right, what I propose is not equivalent to what he does. Edited my answer. –  assylias Apr 16 '12 at 13:21
String[] storage = {
    "text",
    "foo",
    "bar",
    "more text"
};

for(int i=0; i < storage.length(); i++){
    //Do Something
}

Does this help?

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