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I've been approaching network programming these days, and I wrote two simple routines to check if I got it right. So I built the server on the desktop and started it, then I built the client on the laptop and I ran it, and everything went as expected. When I tried to run them the second time and on, the server kept looping and the client after two seconds gave "Error connecting!". If I try again after fifteen minutes it works, but then I have to wait again. Where am I wrong? The computers are both connected to my LAN, 79.13.199.165 is the IP of my modem/router, which forwards every incoming connection on port 53124 to the desktop. This problem doesn't occur when running both server and client on the same PC.

server.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

int main () {
    struct sockaddr_in sa;
    sa.sin_family = AF_INET;
    sa.sin_port = htons(53124);
    sa.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    memset(sa.sin_zero, '\0', sizeof(sa.sin_zero));

    int mysocket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    bind(mysocket, (struct sockaddr*)&sa, sizeof(sa));
    listen(mysocket, 5);

    int inc;
    struct sockaddr_in inc_addr;
    socklen_t inc_addr_size = sizeof(inc_addr);
    inc = accept(mysocket, (struct sockaddr*)&inc_addr, &inc_addr_size);
    if (inc != -1) {
            printf("accepting client\n");
    }
    send(inc, "ciao", sizeof("ciao"), 0);
    close(inc);

    return 0;
}

client.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <netdb.h>

int main () {

    struct sockaddr_in sa;
    sa.sin_family = AF_INET;
    sa.sin_port = htons(53124);
    sa.sin_addr.s_addr = inet_addr("79.13.199.165");
    memset(sa.sin_zero, '\0', sizeof(sa.sin_zero));

   int mysocket = socket(PF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
   if (mysocket == -1) {
       printf("Could not create socket!\n");
    }
   if (connect(mysocket, (struct sockaddr*)&sa, sizeof(sa)) == -1) {
       printf("Error connecting!\n");
    }
   char message[5];
   memset(message, '\0', sizeof(message));
   recv(mysocket, message, 5, 0);
   printf("%s\n", message);

   return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
It is likely that your router does not translate ports when both computers are on the LAN. Try using the private addresses for connection (that is, if you use NAT) –  Tibor Apr 16 '12 at 13:12
3  
Do a Google search for TCP TIME_WAIT and setsockopt SO_REUSEADDR. –  Joachim Pileborg Apr 16 '12 at 13:16
    
So what if I have to accept a new connection from the client I just quitted in less then four minutes? Should I better reduce TIME_WAIT or make the client iterate a range of ports? –  Glaedr Apr 16 '12 at 13:43
    
accepting a new connection is not a problem if you keep running accept() in a loop. It's only when you close the listening socket that address re-use becomes a problem. –  Alnitak Apr 16 '12 at 13:45

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When the server closes the socket, a couple of ACK packets get sent backwards and forwards across the connection. There's no way to tell if the last ACK gets delivered successfully, so the connection goes into the TIME_WAIT state for a bit. This basically gives the TCP stack time to wait for any lost packets and throw them away.

It's possible to ignore this and reuse the socket straight away by setting SO_REUSEADDR using setsockopt(). There is a small danger that subsequent connects might get data they weren't supposed to but it shouldn't be a problem for your little test application.

Edit

By the way, one reason why you were probably getting confused by this is that you don't do any error checking on socket() bind() or listen(). The bind() call would certainly return an error and set errno, EINVAL on Linux.

share|improve this answer
    
So that's not a matter of the client? –  Glaedr Apr 16 '12 at 13:48
    
@Glaedr: No, the client socket port is chosen at random anyway. It's the server side socket that binds to a specific port number that is the problem. –  JeremyP Apr 16 '12 at 13:54

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