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I'm just beginning in programming and I'd like to make exercise from a book, but I can't. That's my problem:

public class increment {
    int increment() {
        return this + 1; // aka this++
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        int a = 0;
        System.out.println(a.increment());
    }
}

As you for sure guessed already, that it doesn't works, I want to ask you how to get outputed integer a incremented by one, but using keyword 'this'.

Regards and sorry for stupid questions.

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2  
You have many fundamental misunderstandings here, making it unlikely you will understand most of the answers. It's also a bit unclear what you want to do here. Do you want to create a class that contains an internal integer, which can be incremented with a increment() method? –  Charles Salvia Apr 16 '12 at 13:23

8 Answers 8

It is strange to name a class like a method. I guess you wanted this:

public class Counter {

int val;

 public Counter (int start) {
   val = start;
 }
 public void increment() {
    val ++;
 }
 public String toString () {
   return Integer.toString (val);
 }

 public static void main(String[] args) {
    Counter counter = new Counter (0);
    counter.increment ();
    System.out.println(counter.toString ());
 }
}
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this is an object (the current object). You cannot "increment" it.

A way to do it is:

public class Increment {
    int a = 0;
    int increment() {
        return a + 1; 
        // or: return this.a + 1;
        // or: a++; return a; if you want a to be incremented from now on
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Increment inc = new Increment();
        System.out.println(inc.increment());
    }
}
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1  
return a + 1; => return ++a; would make sense, or it is not really an increment any more, it is a returnOne. –  assylias Apr 16 '12 at 13:26
    
@assylias: The bug in your comment is a good reason why you should avoid using ++ in an expression that produces a value. Your code returns the old value of a, not the incremented value. –  Mark Peters Apr 16 '12 at 13:27
    
@MarkPeters Haha - true! edited. –  assylias Apr 16 '12 at 13:28
    
inc.increment() does not increment inc. It inc value a of inc. That is not really usefull –  stefan bachert Apr 16 '12 at 13:28
    
Yep, use ++a unless you really mean a++. –  trutheality Apr 16 '12 at 13:29

The this keyword in Java refers to the current scope's object instance. I don't think it's what you're looking for in this case.

In your example, a isn't an object of the class increment, it is a primitive int. In order to use the .increment() function you defined, it would have to be an object of type increment.

One option that may be what you're looking for would be the following.

public class Increment { //Java likes capitalized class names
    private int myInt;    

    public Increment(int a) { //constructor
        myInt = a;
    }

    public int increment() {
        return ++myInt;
    }    

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Increment a = new Increment(0);
        System.out.println(a.increment());
    }

}

In this example, we make a new class of type increment, which internally contains an integer. Its increment method increments that internal integer, and then returns the number.

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you are using operator + for your current object (this). Operator overloading is not supported in java.

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The OP is not likely to understand what you are talking about. –  Charles Salvia Apr 16 '12 at 13:25

Something like this will work:

class MyInteger {
    private int internal;

    public MyInteger( int value ){
        this.internal = value;
    }

    public int incerment(){
        return ++this.internal;
    }
}

public class Increment {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        MyInteger a = new MyInteger(0);
        System.out.println(a.increment());
    }
}

You see, you can only implement methods for your own classes, not for existing classes, or for primitives like int.

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i don't think you can use this to return the value, except if you're making a new class like this:

class Increment1
{
    private int a;
    public int increment2(int a)
    {
        this.a=a;
        return this.a + 1;
    }
}

public class Increment
{

    static Increment1 b = new Increment1();

    public static void main(String[] args)
    {
        int a = 0;
        System.out.println(b.increment2(a));
    }
}
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oh, sorry, i forgot to do that :P will edit it –  aquatorrent Apr 16 '12 at 13:41

You cannot increment a class like this. You have to use a member variable that you can increment.

public class Test {
    private int var;

    public Test(int i) {
        this.var = i;
    }

    int increment() {
       this.var++;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Test t = new Test(0);
    System.out.println(t.increment());

}
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This refers to the current instance of the class, not a particular member.

You want to increment a property (I'm guessing of type long or int), and not the instance of your increment class (should be Increment, by the way).

Something like this would work:

public class increment {

private int innerValue = 0;

int increment() {
    innerValue+=1
    return innerValue; // aka this++
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    increment a = new increment()
    System.out.println(a.increment());
}
}
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2  
a.increment()? Really? ;) –  assylias Apr 16 '12 at 13:23
    
You're right, edited. Didn't notice that part. –  pcalcao Apr 16 '12 at 13:24

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