Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I wrote a basic tic-tac-toe game based on multidimensional arrays. g[3][3]. In my program I have about 9 conditions like the one I am about to show you:

if((g[0][0] == X && g[0][1] == X && g[0][2] == X) || (g[0][0] == O && g[0][1] == O && g[0][2] == O))

This is quite insane. I am probably doing something wrong but this is why I am addressing this question. Is there an easier way of representing long and complicated conditions like this? For example couldn't I somehow do:

if(grid.hasXes)
share|improve this question
5  
A loop? A lookup table? A function? Take your pick... –  Oli Charlesworth Apr 16 '12 at 14:01
    
@Oli Charlesworth, can you give some examples of each? –  Bugster Apr 16 '12 at 14:03
add comment

9 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You're probably going about it the wrong way. There are only 3^9, or 19683 possible combinations, so you can convert your grid to an int, even on a 16 bit machine:

int
asInt( char const (&grid)[3][3] )
{
    int results = 0;
    for ( int i = 0; i != 3; ++ i ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j != 3; ++ j ) {
            results *= 3;
            switch ( grid[i][j] ) {
            case 'X':
                results += 1;
                break;

            case 'Y':
                results += 2;
                break;

            case ' ':
                break;

            default:
                assert(0);
            }
        }
    }
    return results;
}

Afterwards, you can use the int to index into a table indicating who won (if anyone). Alternatively, you can convert just one or the other player's position into a 9 bit int:

int
asInt( char const (&grid)[3][3], char who )
{
    int results = 0;
    for ( int i = 0; i != 3; ++ i ) {
        for ( int j = 0; j != 3; ++ j ) {
            results *= 2;
            if ( grid[i][j] == who ) {
                ++ results;
            }
        }
    }
    return results;
}

You can then use a simple linear search into a table, verifying that the necessary bits are set:

static int const wins[] =
{
    0007, 0070, 0700,       //  rows
    0111, 0222, 0444,       //  columns
    0124, 0421              //  diagonals
};

class Wins
{
    int myToMatch;
public:
    Wins( char const (&grid)[3][3], char who )
        : myToMatch( asInt( grid, who ) )
    {
    }
    bool operator()( int entry ) const
    {
        return (entry & myToMatch) == entry;
    }
};

Then:

if ( std::find_if( begin( wins ), end( wins ), Wins( grid, 'X' ) )
            != end( wins ) {
    //  X wins
else if ( std::find_if( begin( wins ), end( wins ), Wins( grid, 'O' ) )
            != end( wins ) {
    //  O wins
else
    //  play another turn.

You could even consider keeping the grid as two ints, one per player. The bit number for a position would be 3 * i + j, and to test if a move is legal:

bool
isLegal( int gridX, int gridY, int i, int j )
{
    return ((gridX | gridY) & (1 << (3 * i + j))) == 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Wow this answer pretty much makes me think my question was stupid since there are so many ways. This answer makes me feel so small, thanks! –  Bugster Apr 16 '12 at 16:34
2  
@ThePlan Not at all. Seeing such possibilities depends a lot on experience. And the only way to get that experience, and to learn, is to ask such questions. I thought it was a good question; that's why I put some effort into thinking up what I think is a good answer. (And the bit bashing technique at the end is not something that's likely to occur to you unless you've actually done something similar in the past.) –  James Kanze Apr 16 '12 at 17:23
add comment

The simplest -- and most powerful -- way to deal with this kind of issue is simply by extracting the ugly code into a function. That function can be a member of a class, if it's convenient, or simply a free function. In your case, the quick fix could be

bool hasXes(char[3][3] g) {
    return (g[0][0] == X && g[0][1] == X && g[0][2] == X) || (g[0][0] == O && g[0][1] == O && g[0][2] == O)
}

Then you can simply write:

if (hasXes(g)) ...
share|improve this answer
    
you should at least pass X to the function, or assume lambda availability. Or Boost.bind... –  CapelliC Apr 16 '12 at 14:09
add comment

now I got it...

bool check(char *g, int x, int y, int moveX, int moveY, char ch)
{
    for (int i(0); i<3; ++i)
    {
        if ((g+(y*3)+x) != ch) return false;
        x += moveX;
        y += moveY;
    }
    return true;
}

you use it like that:

if (check(g, 0, 0, 0, 1, 'O')) //checking O in the first row.
if (check(g, 0, 0, 0, 1, 'X')) //checking X in the first row.
if (check(g, 0, 0, 1, 0, 'O')) //checking O in the first column.
if (check(g, 0, 0, 1, 0, 'X')) //checking X in the first column.
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could write functions to hide the complexity and enhance the readability of your main driver function. For instance, you could check a row or column to see if it it's all equal to X or O.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This should work:

bool found = false;
int i, j;
for(i = 0; i < 3; i++)
{
    for(j = 0; j < 3; j++)
    {
        if(g[i][j] == X)
        {
            found = true;
            break;
        }
    }
    if(found == true)
    {
        break;
    }
}
if(found == true)
{
    // do something because one of them had X.  i, j have the co-ordinates of the first find of it
}
else
{
    // none of them had X
}

There may be a way to use a goto as well, though those are heavily discouraged in c++. If you only want a row at a time, only use 1 loop.

share|improve this answer
    
I have used gotos in my code despite the fact it's considered a bad practice because I had no patience to think for alternate loops. –  Bugster Apr 16 '12 at 14:10
add comment

One more option to choose from. You can use memcmp if the storage is contiguous

if(!memcmp(g[0],"XXX",3) || !memcmp(g[0],"OOO",3))
share|improve this answer
    
+1 clever, -1 ewwww :) –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 16 '12 at 14:12
    
@ErnestFriedman-Hill: -1 why? –  Abhijit Apr 16 '12 at 14:13
    
Joke. I didn't vote at all. I gave you an imaginary +1 for cleverness and -1 for ugliness; they balance out to no vote. –  Ernest Friedman-Hill Apr 16 '12 at 14:14
    
That's fine for the rows. Now how do you do the columns. (And please: memcmp doesn't return a bool; don't pretend that it does. It just confused people.) –  James Kanze Apr 16 '12 at 15:39
add comment

In this special case there is also the somewhat simpler comparison:

if(g[0][0] == g[0][1] && g[0][1] == g[0][2])

At least assuming there are only X and O possible. Otherwise this will become

if(g[0][0] == g[0][1] && g[0][1] == g[0][2] && ( g[0][1] == X || g[0][1] == O ) )

Which still is a lot simpler IMHO.

If you cannot simplify like this, use a loop as other have pointed out.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Typesafe comments!

const bool first_is_xful = g[0][0] == X && g[0][1] == X && g[0][2] == X,
           second_is_xful = ...;

if (first_is_xful || second_is_xful || ...) ...

Or functions functions:

bool is_xful (int row, ...) ...

...

if (is_ixful(0) || ...
share|improve this answer
add comment

You could count the Xs or try to find them:

Assuming g is a 3 x 3 array, containing characters X or O:

char* end = g + 9;
std::count(g, end, 'X') > 0;

or more efficiently:

char* end = g + 9;
std::find(g, end, 'X') != end;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.