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I have the following:

<div class="btn-group">
    <input disabled="disabled" id="dialogType">
    <button data-toggle="dropdown" class="dropdown-toggle">
    <span class="caret"></span>
    </button>
    <ul class="dropdown-menu" id="towns">
        <li><a data-value="0Z" href="#">A</a></li>
        <li><a data-value="10" href="#">B</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

<div class="btn-group">
    <input disabled="disabled" id="dialogStatus">
    <button data-toggle="dropdown" class="dropdown-toggle">
    <span class="caret"></span>
    </button>
    <ul class="dropdown-menu" id="places">
        <li><a data-value="22" href="#">C</a></li>
        <li><a data-value="33" href="#">D</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

In the past I used the following javascript to populate the #town label field when one of the links is clicked:

$('#towns > li > a').click(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    $('#town').text($(this).html())
 });

Now I would like to make this javascript work for any similar ul that's inside of a DIV with the class dropdown-menu.

So what I would like is:

  • When the user clicks on a link such as A then the first input element inside the btn-group is given the value of A and also a data-value of "0Z"
  • When the user clicks on a link such as D then the first input element inside that btn-group is given the value of D and also a data-value of "33"

Can someone tell me how I could do this. I just need a more generic version of the function above. .

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5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I'd suggest, though currently untested:

$('.dropdown-menu a').click(
    function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        var that = $(this),
            dValue = that.attr('data-value');
        that.closest('.btn-group').find('input:first').attr('data-value',dValue).val(dValue);
    });

Essentially the way this works is:

  1. clicking the link prevents the default action,
  2. finds the closest .btn-group (ancestor) element,
  3. finds the first descendant input element within,
  4. assigns the data-value (assigned to the dValue variable) to the data-value attribute of that input, and finally
  5. assigns the value of dValue to be the value of that input.

Edited in response to comment left by OP:

...I will have more HTML with button groups loaded with Ajax. Sorry I should have said that. Because of that should I also use "on"...

Because the btn-group elements are added dynamically, I'd suggest the following change:

$('#idOfBtnGroupParentElement').on('click','.dropdown-menu a',
    function(e){
        e.preventDefault();
        var that = $(this),
            dValue = that.attr('data-value');
        that.closest('.btn-group').find('input:first').attr('data-value',dValue).val(dValue);
    });

References:

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Hello David, Richard suggested using "on". I will have more HTML with button groups loaded with Ajax. Sorry I should have said that. Because of that should I also use "on". Would that make your function work even for code that's added later on or would I need to do another call of your code inside of another document ready after the ajax had reloaded? –  Marie J Apr 16 '12 at 14:27
    
@MarieJ, see the edits. You could rebind the click-handler in the Ajax that adds the new btn-group elements, but it's easier to use on() bound to the parent element of the btn-group elements. Or to whatever ancestor element of those elements that exists in the DOM on DOMReady. And yes, it would've been easier if we'd known that from the start... =) Oh, and who's Richard..? –  David Thomas Apr 16 '12 at 14:36
    
Richard Neil - the other poster who answered. Thanks for your quick reply. –  Marie J Apr 16 '12 at 14:47
    
Ah! You're quite welcome, I'm glad to have been of help (and, hopefully, I was...) =) –  David Thomas Apr 16 '12 at 14:49
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You can use .closest to find the closest parent of the clicked element, that matches a given selector.

For setting the value of an input, use .val, for setting a data property, use .data

$('.btn-group a').click(function(e) {
   e.preventDefault();
   var input = $(this).closest('.btn-group').find('input');

   input.val($(this).html());
   input.data('value', $(this).data('value'));
});
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this should do the trick...

$(".dropdown-menu a").click(function(e){
   e.preventDefault();

   var value = $(this).data("value");
   var text = $(this).html();

   var input = $(this).parents(".btn-group").find("input");

   input.data("value", value);
   input.val(text);
});
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This is about as generic as they go, I guess. I'm using delegates because I don't know how many of these a elements you've got.

$('.btn-group').on('click', '.dropdown-menu a', function (e) {

    var $this = $(this),
        $input = $this.closest('.btn-group').find('input:first')
        ;
    e.preventDefault();

    $input.val($this.html())
          .attr('data-value', $this.attr('data-value'))
          ;        
});

Do take note that I'm using .on, so you should be using jQuery 1.7 or higher to use that. If not, take a look at how to do it old school with delegate.

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Thanks very much. Can you tell me what's the reason for doing: var $this = $(this) ? –  Marie J Apr 16 '12 at 14:20
    
One more question. I will have this at the bottom of my page inside of a document ready. However the code with the btn groups can get reloaded with ajax. As you have used "on" then will this still apply to the new HTML that's loaded onto the page? –  Marie J Apr 16 '12 at 14:23
    
You cache the result of $(this) to a variable, so that you don't have to perform the evaluation more than once. Each $(this) calls a function, and we want to get rid of as much function overhead as we can. jQuery is fast, but it's always best to put in optimizations such as this when you're coding. :) –  Richard Neil Ilagan Apr 16 '12 at 15:36
    
As for your second question, if the .btn-group elements themselves are being loaded dynamically, then you have to bring the delegate selector up to a higher level. For example, if your .btn-group elements are being loaded inside a #menus element and that is static, you need to modify my answer to read $('#menus').on('click','.btn-group .dropdown-menu a', function () {}) instead. –  Richard Neil Ilagan Apr 16 '12 at 15:39
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$('ul.dropdown-menu a').on('click', function(e) {
  e.preventDefault();
  $(this).parent().parent().parent().find('input:first').val($(this).text()).attr('data-value', $(this).attr('data-value'));
});
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