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I have problem with serialization. I want to convert an object into a string and vice versa. I have two utility methods:

public
static byte[] Serialize(Object o)
{
   MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
   BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
   bf1.Serialize(ms, o);
   byte[] buffer = ms.ToArray();
   //string retStr = Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
   return buffer;
}

public static object Deserialize(byte[] TheByteArray)
{
   //byte[] TheByteArray = Convert.FromBase64String(ParamStr);
   MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(TheByteArray);
   BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
   ms.Position = 0;
   return bf1.Deserialize(ms);
}

My test code is:

Student obj = new Student ();
obj.UserName = "Admin";
obj.Password = "Password";
obj.lessonIds = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
obj.lessonNames= new string[] { "Spanish", "Maths" };
obj.Id= 43;
byte[] retByteArray = Crypto.Serialize(obj);

Student objNew = new Student ();
objNew = (Student )Crypto.Deserialize(retByteArray);

this code does not work. The error message is : Exception has been thrown by the target of an invocation. End of Stream encountered before parsing was completed.

End my main aim is convert object into string but I even cannot convert it into byte array

share|improve this question
    
What is Cryto referring too? –  dan richardson Jun 19 '09 at 12:24
    
This isn't the bug, but you don't need to Student objNew = new Student (); before calling Deserialize. You are just creating an object and then replacing it with another one. –  David Basarab Jun 19 '09 at 12:32
    
Re your comment - then simply, you are deserializing it incorrectly. It really isn't worth trying to write your own serialization code - I strongly recommend trying protobuf-net (caveat: I'm the author, but it is free). It took seconds to apply to your example, giving very efficient results without the risk of these annoying stream bugs. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 18:28

3 Answers 3

I have just tried the original code and it work's fine however, you need to make sure that the student class definition is marked as [Serializable]

[Serializable]
public class Student
{
    public string UserName;
    public string Password;
    public int[] lessonIds;
    public string[] lessonNames;
    public int Id;
    public Student() { }
}
share|improve this answer

That code works perfectly for me (I simply added the missing Student class. Is that code actually representative of your real code. In particular, buffer handling (maybe file IO) would be my first suspicion. But the bug isn't in the code you posted... it works fine.

As an aside... BinaryFormatter can be brittle, especially around different versions - you may want to consider alternative serializers. Ask for more info if you are interested.

Here it is runnable:

using System.IO;
using System.Runtime.Serialization.Formatters.Binary;
using System;
static class Crypto
{
    static byte[] Serialize(object o)
    {
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream();
        BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
        bf1.Serialize(ms, o);
        byte[] buffer = ms.ToArray();
        //string retStr = Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
        return buffer;
    }

    public static object Deserialize(byte[] TheByteArray)
    {
        //byte[] TheByteArray = Convert.FromBase64String(ParamStr);
        MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(TheByteArray);
        BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
        ms.Position = 0;
        return bf1.Deserialize(ms);
    }
    [Serializable]
    class Student
    {
        public string UserName { get; set; }
        public string Password { get; set; }
        public int[] LessonIds { get; set; }
        public string[] LessonNames { get; set; }
        public int Id { get; set; }
    }
    static void Main()
    {
        Student obj = new Student();
        obj.UserName = "Admin";
        obj.Password = "Password";
        obj.LessonIds = new int[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
        obj.LessonNames = new string[] { "Spanish", "Maths" };
        obj.Id = 43;
        byte[] retByteArray = Crypto.Serialize(obj);

        Student objNew = (Student)Crypto.Deserialize(retByteArray);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
For info, I jut ran it through protobuf-net for comparison: BinaryFormatter=363 bytes; protobuf-net=45 bytes... –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 12:48
    
Thank you everybody. I found my mistake. My student class implements ISerializable interface; when I remove it, it works. But I did not understand problem with interface. –  user125687 Jun 19 '09 at 15:22

You might be suffering from a race condition, because you're not closing the memory stream or your formatter when you're done serializing.

Try this:

public
static byte[] Serialize(Object o)
{
   using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream())
   {
       BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
       bf1.Serialize(ms, o);
       byte[] buffer = ms.ToArray();
       //string retStr = Convert.ToBase64String(buffer);
   }
   return buffer;
}

public static object Deserialize(byte[] TheByteArray)
{
   //byte[] TheByteArray = Convert.FromBase64String(ParamStr);
   using (MemoryStream ms = new MemoryStream(TheByteArray))
   {
       BinaryFormatter bf1 = new BinaryFormatter();
       ms.Position = 0;
       var result = bf1.Deserialize(ms);
   }
   return result;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That shouldn't make any difference in this case... –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 12:29
    
@Marc You don't think so? Why? –  Joseph Jun 19 '09 at 12:31
2  
You aren't doing anything extra in the code before getting the ToArray(), so you aren't changing the results. All you add is a Dispose() to something that has an empty Dispose() implementation. Don't get me wrong, I always dispose these things too - but that isn't the bug. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 12:38
    
Oh, and BinaryFormatter isn't IDisposable... –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 12:39
1  
BinaryFormatter doesn't have a Close(). MemoryStream has one because every Stream has one. I fully agree that it would be better practice to use "using" here... simply that this isn't causing the bug. –  Marc Gravell Jun 19 '09 at 13:16

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