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How do I add an include path for kernel module makefile? I want to include "test_kernel.h" in test_module.c. the "test_kernel.h" resides in other directory "inc" I tried in the following solution in my Makefile but it does not work:

obj-m += test_module.o

    $(MAKE) -C "$(LINUX_DIR)" -Iinc $(MAKE_OPTS) modules
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3 Answers 3

You should make use of EXTRA_CFLAGS in your Makefile. Try something on these lines:

obj-m += test_module.o

    $(MAKE) -C "$(LINUX_DIR)" $(MAKE_OPTS) modules

See section 3.7 Compilation Flags section here.
Hope this helps!

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This is very useful. Reading the newer doc, it seems EXTRA_CFLAGS is deprecated now. You may use ccflags-y=-I$(PWD)/inc instead of EXTRA_CFLAGS. Check section 3.7 here. – hesham_EE Oct 27 '14 at 17:22

are you sure you correctly specified the include in your file?


#include "inc/something.h"

instead of

#include <inc/something.h>
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-I is a GCC flag, not a Make flag.1 You need to pass a variable down to your "sub" Make process; perhaps something like this:

$(MAKE) -C "$(LINUX_DIR)" CPPFLAGS="-Iinc" $(MAKE_OPTS) modules

where CPPFLAGS is a standard Make variable that's used in the implicit rules. Feel free to use your own variable instead, and ensure it's used appropriately in the sub-make.

The Make manual gives more details on communicating variables between Make instances:

1. Actually, it is also a Make flag, but for something completely unrelated.

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I replaced the -Iinc by CFLAGS=inc and it does not work too – MOHAMED Apr 16 '12 at 14:51
@MohamedKALLEL: Yes, I got that slightly wrong. I've updated my answer. – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 16 '12 at 14:54
even with CPPFLAGS="-Iinc" does not work – MOHAMED Apr 16 '12 at 15:03
@MohamedKALLEL: Is your sub-make using default rules for C compilation? If not, do the explicit rules use the CPPFLAGS variable? – Oliver Charlesworth Apr 16 '12 at 15:09

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