Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is it possible to add the .gitignore file, to .gitignore itself

.gitignore

Doesn't work throught

I don't want to see it in edited files

share|improve this question
2  
why would you want to do that? just commit your changes. .gitignore is supposed to be part of your repository, listing file patterns that are junk for the project. –  KurzedMetal Apr 16 '12 at 15:25
1  
.gitignore should be part of your repository, so that everyone on your team is ignoring or checking in the same files. Just because .gitignore is in your code folders somewhere doesn't mean you have to deploy it. –  Kyralessa May 23 '12 at 21:40
    
possible duplicate of How do I tell Git to ignore ".gitignore"? –  That Brazilian Guy Sep 9 '13 at 14:58

4 Answers 4

up vote 38 down vote accepted

The .gitignore file is to prevent everyone who collaborates on a project to include some common files in a project, such as generated cache files. Therefore you should not ignore .gitignore, because it's purpose is to be included in the repo.

If you want to ignore files in just one repo but without comitting the ignore list you can add them to .git/info/exclude in that repo.

If you want to ignore some files on every repo on your machine you can create the file ~/.gitignore_global and then run

git config --global core.excludesfile ~/.gitignore_global
share|improve this answer

There's not really a good reason to do this. If you want files ignored for your clone only, add them to .git/info/exclude, not .gitignore

share|improve this answer

A .gitignore can ignore itself if it's never been checked in:

mhaase@ubuntu:~$ git --version
git version 1.7.9.5
mhaase@ubuntu:~$ git init temp
Initialized empty Git repository in /home/mhaase/temp/.git/
mhaase@ubuntu:~$ cd temp
mhaase@ubuntu:~/temp$ touch .gitignore foo bar baz bat
mhaase@ubuntu:~/temp$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       .gitignore
#       bar
#       bat
#       baz
#       foo
mhaase@ubuntu:~/temp$ echo "foo" >> .gitignore
mhaase@ubuntu:~/temp$ echo ".gitignore" >> .gitignore
mhaase@ubuntu:~/temp$ git status
# On branch master
#
# Initial commit
#
# Untracked files:
#   (use "git add <file>..." to include in what will be committed)
#
#       bar
#       bat
#       baz
nothing added to commit but untracked files present (use "git add" to track)

If you check in .gitignore (before you tell it to ignore itself), then it will always show up in git status, even if you later modify it to ignore itself.

share|improve this answer
    
Exactly, this is my case. I want to have a local .gitignore for working with git-svn, which no-one should see. So I just added it to itself and it just worked. But then I googled to see if some uptight people will explain to others how this is "bad". This answer should be accepted, and then I would upvote the .git/info/exclude suggestions also. So it just needs to be untracked... Not very surprising, at least if you've ever been "subverted" (svn). –  Tomasz Gandor Oct 21 at 13:03

Yes you can; you still see it in edited files because it is still tracked by git, and files tracked by git are always marked as modified even if they are in .gitignore. So simply untrack it.

But why not committing or resetting changes that you have on it? It's a much better way to remove it from status... Also be aware that any fresh clone of you repo will have to add its .gitignore, which can be annoying.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, and you will need to remove it separately from git by got rm --cached .gitignore, probably. –  Tadeck Apr 16 '12 at 15:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.