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I have a table with the following columns in a MySQL database

[id, url]

And the urls are like:

 http://domain1.com/images/img1.jpg

I want to update all the urls to another domain

 http://domain2.com/otherfolder/img1.jpg

keeping the name of the file as is.

What's the query must I run?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 124 down vote accepted
UPDATE urls
SET url = REPLACE(url, 'domain1.com/images/', 'domain2.com/otherfolder/')
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UPDATE yourtable
SET url = REPLACE(url, 'http://domain1.com/images/', 'http://domain2.com/otherfolder/')
WHERE url LIKE ('http://domain1.com/images/%');

relevant docs: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.5/en/string-functions.html#function_replace

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+1 for the reference to the documentation... –  Phil DD Aug 14 '14 at 16:19
5  
Hi there- why do I need the where ? –  Guy Cohen Oct 7 '14 at 14:21

Try using the REPLACE function:

mysql> SELECT REPLACE('www.mysql.com', 'w', 'Ww');
        -> 'WwWwWw.mysql.com'

Note that it is case sensitive.

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+ for pointing case sensitivity. –  kubilay Dec 31 '12 at 11:24
    
How do you do CASE - INSENSITIVE? Am stack plz hlp. thx –  Universal Grasp Dec 26 '13 at 14:05

You need the WHERE clause to replace ONLY the records that complies with the condition in the WHERE clause (as opposed to all records). You use % sign to indicate partial string: I.E.

LIKE ('...//domain1.com/images/%'); means all records that BEGIN with "...//domain1.com/images/" and have anything AFTER (that's the % for...)

Another example:

LIKE ('%http://domain1.com/images/%') which means all records that contains "http://domain1.com/images/" in any part of the string...

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