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I would like to Mock the System.IO.FileInfo.Extension Method and have it return ".xls" but I can't get anything to work

This Example works great for Delete but not for Extension (The code will not compile)

  [ClassInitialize]
      public static void Initialize(TestContext context)
      {
         Mock.Partial<FileInfo>().For((x) => x.Extension);
      }

I Have also tried using this example but the code is wrong.

  • I have a fully licensed copy of JustMock
  • I am using VS 2010 .net 4.0

Edit: I know I can setup a interface and test that way, but the paid version JustMock is supposed to mock concrete classes. Since I paid for it, I would like to know how to do it that way.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With the latest release of JustMock (Q2 2012). You no longer need the MockClassAtriibute for mocking MsCrolib members.

You can write above test very much in the following way:

[TestClass]
public class UnitTest1
{
        [ClassInitialize]
        public static void Init(TestContext context)
        {
            Mock.Replace<FileInfo, string>(x=> x.Extension).In<UnitTest1>();
        }


       [TestMethod]
       public void ShouldAssertFileInfoExtension()
       {
           var fileInfo = Mock.Create<FileInfo>(Constructor.Mocked);

           string expected = "test";

           Mock.Arrange(() => fileInfo.Extension).Returns(expected);

           Assert.AreEqual(fileInfo.Extension, expected);
       }
}
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Guess I was missing an attribute

[TestClass, MockClass] // **MockClass Added**
public class UnitTest1
{
        [ClassInitialize]
        public static void Init(TestContext context)
        {
             Mock.Partial<FileInfo>().For<FileInfo, string>(x => x.Extension);
        }


       [TestMethod]
       public void ShouldAssertFileInfoExtension()
       {
           var fileInfo = Mock.Create<FileInfo>(Constructor.Mocked);

           string expected = "test";

           Mock.Arrange(() => fileInfo.Extension).Returns(expected);

           Assert.AreEqual(fileInfo.Extension, expected);
       }

}
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Good, thanks for sharing the answer with us! –  C. Ross Apr 18 '12 at 13:06
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It sounds to me like you just need to abstract that dependency into another wrapper class and then it would be easy to mock.

 public class FileInfoAbstraction
 {
      protected FileInfo _fileInfo = null;

      public virtual string Extension
      {
          get { return _fileInfo.Extension; }
      }

      public FileInfoAbstraction(string path)
      {
          _fileInfo = new FileInfo(path);
      }
 }

Then, wherever you were using the FileInfo class, insert your abstraction:

 var myFileInfo = new FileInfoAbstraction(somePath);

Because the extension is marked as virtual now, most mocking frameworks will be able to modify it.

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Yes I would agree with you @Tejs and I have done that in the past but I have been told that JustMock will mock Concrete classes and would like to use Concrete classes –  Micah Armantrout Apr 16 '12 at 15:59
    
Perhaps, but I find it would be better anyways to extract those hard dependencies into their own class anyways. Plus, you'll probably need to go with the factory pattern anyways to remove the new call from your code to make it more unit testable. –  Tejs Apr 16 '12 at 16:02
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