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Sometimes Im getting problems with locking, such as:

java.sql.SQLTransactionRollbackException: A lock could not be obtained within the time requested

I'm using Hibernate with C3p0 pooling, and have Hibernate configured for Optimistic locking.

I also have some code that bypasses Hibernate and talks to the database via independently configured c3p0 pooling. This is purely because this code existed before I moved to Hibernate and works perfectly well so I saw no need to change it at the time.

Now I wondering if having two independently configured c3p0 pools could be causing problems. If not how can I track down tthe cause of these exceptions, I have pooling set to between 20 and 100 connections and I only have a maximum of twelve threads concurrently and I think all my transactions/session are being closed when I finish with them.

EDIT:Now have single pool but still getting a problem, gettting the following error but no details as to the cause of it, one thing Ive noticed is that it always says Managed Thread: 3

Exception with lookup
12:42:36,627  WARN ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner:608 - com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$DeadlockDetector@1ff96a2 -- APPARENT DEADLOCK!!! Creating emergency threads for unassigned pending tasks!
12:42:36,628  WARN ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner:624 - com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$DeadlockDetector@1ff96a2 -- APPARENT DEADLOCK!!! Complete Status: 
    Managed Threads: 3
    Active Threads: 3
    Active Tasks: 
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask@fdfb9a (com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#0)
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask@914847 (com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#2)
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask@205390 (com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#1)
    Pending Tasks: 
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask@4e171b
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@ceeecb
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@19f7cec
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@1c299f9
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@10ab38a
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@1916a2f
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@1d23fbf
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@573b7c
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@1027733
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@dfd9b0
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@4cecbb
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask@4a0d0b
        com.mchange.v2.resourcepool.BasicResourcePool$1RefurbishCheckinResourceTask@19e809d
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@10de0f8
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StmtAcquireTask@2ce568
Pool thread stack traces:
    Thread[com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#0,5,JAIKOZ Thread Group]
        org.apache.derby.impl.jdbc.EmbedStatement.close(Unknown Source)
        com.mchange.v1.db.sql.StatementUtils.attemptClose(StatementUtils.java:41)
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask.run(GooGooStatementCache.java:404)
        com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread.run(ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner.java:547)
    Thread[com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#2,5,JAIKOZ Thread Group]
        org.apache.derby.impl.jdbc.EmbedStatement.close(Unknown Source)
        com.mchange.v1.db.sql.StatementUtils.attemptClose(StatementUtils.java:41)
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask.run(GooGooStatementCache.java:404)
        com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread.run(ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner.java:547)
    Thread[com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread-#1,5,JAIKOZ Thread Group]
        org.apache.derby.impl.jdbc.EmbedStatement.close(Unknown Source)
        com.mchange.v1.db.sql.StatementUtils.attemptClose(StatementUtils.java:41)
        com.mchange.v2.c3p0.stmt.GooGooStatementCache$1StatementCloseTask.run(GooGooStatementCache.java:404)
        com.mchange.v2.async.ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner$PoolThread.run(ThreadPoolAsynchronousRunner.java:547)

It may be this problem

https://forum.hibernate.org/viewtopic.php?p=2390809

share|improve this question
    
I could probably move to h2 if that is better –  Paul Taylor Apr 18 '12 at 14:58
    
H2 does support Multi Version Concurrency. It's supposed to help avoid using mutexes and locks like my example below. It probably wouldn't hurt to try. –  Jason Huntley Apr 18 '12 at 15:13

2 Answers 2

Given that SQLTransactionRollbackException is a database level lock failure, the independently configured c3p0 pools alone are not the cause of this problem. If that were the case, you wouldn't be able to run two instances of the same Hibernate-based application.

The first step here should be using the debugger to stop when that exception gets thrown. Then check the other database connection pool threads to see if they're in the process of doing anything with the database. If they are, that'll be the first place to look, as you may have a deadlock caused by database-level locks. This step may be easier if you can turn down the number of threads in the pools while still reproducing the problem.

It is possible though that the cause is a database lock that was obtained by another thread, and then was not released. If that's the case, you'll have to use your database tools to find out what resource couldn't be obtained by the exception-throwing thread, and then try to figure out who owns that lock and why.

Good luck.

share|improve this answer
    
Well I did change the code and the problem seems to have gone away, but I did have to change some other stuff in order to do this so it maybe you are right and it is a conincidence. One thing I'm confused about is does having Hibernate sessions open longer cause it to hold onto databae locks longer, previously I didn't think it did but Im now not so sure. –  Paul Taylor Apr 18 '12 at 10:28
    
If you do things that would get a lock, and never tell the Session that you're done, then yeah, those locks would still be held. Put another way, I would certainly expect any db locks that a Session opened to be closed in .close(), or in .commit() if within a transaction. If you never call those methods, they'd be held for some amount of time depending on database settings. –  sharakan Apr 18 '12 at 11:25
    
I always close , and commit but if the session is open for some time that doesnt really help , I dont know how to find out when Hibernate actually aquires a lock –  Paul Taylor Apr 18 '12 at 11:45
    
That's really a database question, not a hibernate one. It depends on the SQL being run, and the transaction settings, and what te db implementation is capable of: eg, row-level locking or table? You might be able to track it down by stepping through code and using the database specific tools to look at what locks are outstanding. –  sharakan Apr 18 '12 at 12:33

I've experienced issues with Hibernate in an embedded environment. We use SQLite to perform client side database operations. I've found that embedded databases have limited or crude methods for handling multithreaded operations. YOu will probably have to check for a lock on the database before commiting or possibly even starting any transactions.

With SQLite you can have threads enter read as a transaction is in progress. However, you cannot have one or more threads write or open transactions simultaneously. In addition, the real stickler which was hard to find, you can't commit a transaction while any query is taking place! Otherwise, you will encounter a lock exception similar to what you have encountered.

I actually created a semaphore latching lock to keep track of all the open read operations and enable safe interactions with transactions:

    /**
     * Enter read section. Increment the latch so commiting
     * threads know how many reads are left till it's appropriate
     * to write/commit.
     *
     * @throws InterruptedException the interrupted exception
     */
    public void enterReadSection() throws InterruptedException {
        if (enableReadLock && (transactionLock.availablePermits()==0)) {
            readLock.lock();
            try {
                log.debug("Waiting on database unlock.");
                readWait.await();
            } finally {
                readLock.unlock();
                log.debug("Database Unlocked.");
            }
        }

        if (enableReadLock) {
            synchronized(this) {
                latch = new CountDownLatch((int)latch.getCount()+1);
            }
        }
    }

    /**
     * Exit read section.
     */
    public void exitReadSection( ) {
        if (enableReadLock)
            latch.countDown();
    }

   /**
     * Trx lock.
     *
     * @throws InterruptedException the interrupted exception
     */
    public void trxLock() throws InterruptedException {
        if (enableTrxLock)
            transactionLock.acquire();
    }

    /**
     * Trx unlock.
     */
    public void trxUnlock() {
        if (enableTrxLock)
            transactionLock.release();
    }

    /**
     * Commit lock.
     *
     * @throws InterruptedException the interrupted exception
     */
    public void commitLock() throws InterruptedException {
        if (enableCommitLock) {
            commitLock.acquire();

            //Wait for reading threads to complete
            latch.await();
        }
    }

    /**
     * Commit unlock.
     *
     * @throws InterruptedException the interrupted exception
     */
    public void commitUnlock() throws InterruptedException {
        if(enableCommitLock) {
            commitLock.release();
            releaseRead();
        }
    }

I know, some deep magic going on there, but it's what I came up with after much trail and error. I wish it could be simpler, but usually the client/server frontends to databases offload much of the concurrency issues, so you don't witness it as much with Oracle, mysql, postgres, etc...

I imagine you will need some kind of concurrency checking mechanism, semaphor, or latch while working with derby as well. I don't know as much about derby, but it sounds like it has primitive thread safety mechanisms built into it as well. YOu will probably have to work around these limitations. Good Luck!

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