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I'm right now debugging a program which has two threads per one external process, and those two threads keep on reading Process.getErrorStream() and Process.getInputStream() using a while ((i = in.read(buf, 0, buf.length)) >= 0) loop.

Sometimes when the external process crashes due to a JVM crash (see these hs_err_pid.log files), those threads which read the stdout/stderr of that external process begin consuming 100% CPU and never exit. The loop body is not being executed (I've added a logging statement there), so the infinite loop appears to be inside the native method java.io.FileInputStream.readBytes.

I've reproduced this on both Windows 7 64-bit (jdk1.6.0_30 64-bit, jdk1.7.0_03 64-bit), and Linux 2.6.18 (jdk1.6.0_21 32-bit). The code in question is here and it is used like this. See those links for the full code - here are the interesting bits:

private final byte[]              buf = new byte[256];
private final InputStream         in;
...    

int i;
while ((i = this.in.read(this.buf, 0, this.buf.length)) >= 0) {
    ...
}

The stack traces look like

"PIT Stream Monitor" daemon prio=6 tid=0x0000000008869800 nid=0x1f70 runnable [0x000000000d7ff000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at java.io.FileInputStream.readBytes(Native Method)
    at java.io.FileInputStream.read(FileInputStream.java:220)
    at java.io.BufferedInputStream.fill(BufferedInputStream.java:218)
    at java.io.BufferedInputStream.read1(BufferedInputStream.java:258)
    at java.io.BufferedInputStream.read(BufferedInputStream.java:317)
    - locked <0x00000007c89d6d90> (a java.io.BufferedInputStream)
    at org.pitest.util.StreamMonitor.readFromStream(StreamMonitor.java:38)
    at org.pitest.util.StreamMonitor.process(StreamMonitor.java:32)
    at org.pitest.util.AbstractMonitor.run(AbstractMonitor.java:19)
   Locked ownable synchronizers:
    - None

or

"PIT Stream Monitor" daemon prio=6 tid=0x0000000008873000 nid=0x1cb8 runnable [0x000000000e3ff000]
   java.lang.Thread.State: RUNNABLE
    at java.io.FileInputStream.readBytes(Native Method)
    at java.io.FileInputStream.read(FileInputStream.java:220)
    at org.pitest.util.StreamMonitor.readFromStream(StreamMonitor.java:38)
    at org.pitest.util.StreamMonitor.process(StreamMonitor.java:32)
    at org.pitest.util.AbstractMonitor.run(AbstractMonitor.java:19)
   Locked ownable synchronizers:
    - None

With the Sysinternals Process Explorer I was able to get native stack traces of those threads. Most often, over 80% of the time, the stack trace looks like this:

ntdll.dll!NtReadFile+0xa
KERNELBASE.dll!ReadFile+0x7a
kernel32.dll!ReadFile+0x59
java.dll!handleRead+0x2c
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x1d1
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

This also happens quite often:

ntdll.dll!RtlNtStatusToDosErrorNoTeb+0x52
ntdll.dll!RtlNtStatusToDosError+0x23
KERNELBASE.dll!GetCurrentThreadId+0x2c
KERNELBASE.dll!CreatePipe+0x21a
kernel32.dll!ReadFile+0x59
java.dll!handleRead+0x2c
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x1d1
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

ntdll.dll!RtlNtStatusToDosErrorNoTeb+0x42
ntdll.dll!RtlNtStatusToDosError+0x23
KERNELBASE.dll!GetCurrentThreadId+0x2c
KERNELBASE.dll!CreatePipe+0x21a
kernel32.dll!ReadFile+0x59
java.dll!handleRead+0x2c
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x1d1
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

And sometimes it's executing this part of the code:

java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0xc3
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

java.dll!Java_sun_io_Win32ErrorMode_setErrorMode+0x847c
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0xd7
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

jvm.dll!JNI_GetCreatedJavaVMs+0x1829f
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x128
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

jvm.dll+0x88c1
jvm.dll!JNI_GetCreatedJavaVMs+0x182a7
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x128
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x10b
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

jvm.dll!JNI_CreateJavaVM+0x1423
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x190
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

jvm.dll+0x88bf
jvm.dll!JNI_CreateJavaVM+0x147d
java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x190
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x1aa
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x1c3
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

java.dll!VerifyClassCodesForMajorVersion+0x224
java.dll!Java_java_io_FileInputStream_readBytes+0x1d

Any ideas how to solve this problem? Is this a known problem with the JVM? Is there a workaround?

share|improve this question
3  
Could you include your loop code? BTW the condition >= 0 is overly broad, if buf.length is non-zero, then read() is guaranteed to read at least 1 byte or return -1 (or throw an Exception). –  Mark Rotteveel Apr 16 '12 at 16:48
    
What? Is Process.getInputStream() returning a FileInputStream? –  Martijn Courteaux Apr 16 '12 at 17:28
    
Yes. In java.lang.ProcessImpl#ProcessImpl you can see stdout_stream and stderr_stream being initialized with a FileInputStream. It kinda makes sense from the Unix point of view, where everything is a file. –  Esko Luontola Apr 16 '12 at 17:57
3  
Looking at OpenJDK's source code, the implementation of readBytes has no loops and is a thin wrapper over Windows' ReadFile function. Let's continue looking into OS issues... maybe antivirus or something... –  Esko Luontola Apr 16 '12 at 19:33
1  
This issue might be related: weblogs.java.net/blog/kohsuke/archive/2009/09/28/… –  Esko Luontola Apr 17 '12 at 8:03
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1 Answer

I've not yet been able to reproduce this locally, but the two possible workarounds might be

  • Play around with in.available().

  • Redirect stout and stderr in the external process to a socket and read this from the controlling process instead.

share|improve this answer
    
A quick fix using in.available() has helped to avoid the problem for now. We are still looking for a better solution and the reason why this is happening in the first place. I'll try to produce a SSCCE by removing superfluous code from the closed source project where I can reproduce this. –  Esko Luontola Apr 21 '12 at 14:31
    
The problem can be re-produced by crashing the child process with the infinite array allocating loop from stackoverflow.com/questions/65200/how-do-you-crash-a-jvm and probably the other techniques listed there. –  henry Apr 22 '12 at 20:03
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