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Right now I have this:

array1 = [obj1, obj2, obj3, obj4]
array2 = [obj1, obj2, obj5, obj6]

array1.each do |item1|
  array2.each do |item2|
    if (item1[0] == item2[0]) && (item1[1] == item2[1])
      p "do stuff"
    end
  end
end

I need to match 2 pieces of data from each array but both arrays are very large and I'm wondering if there is a faster way to do this.

My current setup requires looking at each element in the second array for each element in the first array which seems terribly inefficient.

share|improve this question
    
Yes, it's slow, specifically: it's quadratic. But note that the problem is the two outer loops and not the inner test. –  DigitalRoss Apr 16 '12 at 18:14
    
Yeah I was hoping there might be a way that didn't require me to loop through the inner array for each element of the outer array. –  Josh Apr 16 '12 at 18:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Combining map and intersection:

(array1.map { |a| a.first 2 } & array2.map { |a| a.first 2 }).each do
  p "do_stuff"
end

Performance should be good. Memory intensive though.

share|improve this answer
    
Good answer, intersection actually uses hash, so it should be quick. –  megas Apr 18 '12 at 0:22
    
This does quite something different than the code Josh posted. It only executes the if once, Josh's code executes it for every matching pair. Josh doesn't clarify whether he needs access to item1 & item2. But if so, then your solution also doesn't cater for that. –  apeiros Apr 18 '12 at 14:10
    
@apeiros, fair enough on your first point. Please see edit. –  seph Apr 18 '12 at 16:39

If the two arrays is all you have, you can't avoid the O(n^2) complexity that DigitalRoss mentioned. However, you can index the data so that the next time you don't have to do it all again. In the simplest case, you can use hashes to allow direct access to your data based on the criteria used in the test:

index1 = array1.each_with_object({}){|e, acc|
  acc[[e[0], e[1]]] ||= []
  acc[[e[0], e[1]]] << e
}

and the same thing for the other array. Then, your loop would look like:

index1.each do |key1, vals1|
  if vals2 = index2[key1]
    vals1.product(vals2).each do |e1, e2|
      p do_stuff
    end
  end
end

which is, I believe, O(n).

share|improve this answer

This is very slow because - as DigitalRoss already stated - it is O(n^2). Assuming that eql? is just as fine for you as ==, you can build an index and iterate over that instead, that'll be O(n+m) instead:

array1 = [obj1, obj2, obj3, obj4]
array2 = [obj1, obj2, obj5, obj6]
index  = {}
found  = []

array1.each do |item1| index[item1.first(2)] = item1 end
array2.each do |item2|
  item1 = index[item2.first(2)]
  found << [item1,item2] if item1 then
end

found.each do |item1, item2| puts "do something" end

This assumes that the combination of the first 2 elements of all elements in array1 are unique within array1. If that's not the case, the code will be slightly more complex:

array1 = [obj1, obj2, obj3, obj4]
array2 = [obj1, obj2, obj5, obj6]
index  = {}
found  = []

array1.each do |item1|
  key          = item1.first(2)
  index[key] ||= []
  index[key]  << item1
end
array2.each do |item2|
  items_from_1 = index[item2.first(2)]
  if items_from_1 then
    found.concat(items_from_1.map { |item1| [item1,item2] })
  end
end

found.each do |item1, item2| puts "do something" end

Since you didn't provide any sample data, I didn't test the code.

I hope that helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, somehow code went AWOL when copying from my editor - no idea how that happened. I've added the missing parts back in. My apologies if you read it before and it didn't make sense :) –  apeiros Apr 16 '12 at 21:13

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